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A Bad Sign. 

Within the past year a number of col- 
lege presidents have been forced to re- 
sign because their political views did 
not accord with those held hy a majority 
of the trustees. This does not sound 
well for free America. It is a kind of 
tyranny that deserves to be severely 
rebuked. If our institutions are com- 
pelled to accept, without reserve, the 
opinions of rich men in order to get 
their money then they tud better refuse 
it altogether. Not every oil or railroad 
magnate knows how to run a college. 
Money-making does not require the 
greatest amount of brain-power. 

It is supposed that institutions of 
learning are striving to know and teach 
the truth. In order to do this they must 
pursue their work without bias. Better 
to be poor and free than bound with 
even golden fetters. Let it be under- 
stood that a man's opinions are not 
more correct simply because he is rich. 
It sometimes occurs that a man even 
assumes to rule a church because he has 
contributed largely to it. There was 
never a more brazen piece of impudence 
and the church lacks manhood that will 
suffer it. 



* 



The Salisbury District Conference. 

The Salisbury district conference con- 
vened at Albemarle, Jul}- 29. It was one 
of the most pleasant sessions we have 
attended. Harmony and goodwill 
marked all its proceedings. There were 
no recommendations to the annual con- 



ference for admission into the travelling 
connection. Repoits indicated marked 
improvements along all lines of church 
work. The growth of the Lpw-orth 
League is especially noticeable. It has 
found its way into every charge and the 
brethren are demonstrating its adapt- 
ability to the country as well as the 
town. The influence of our annual 
League gatherings is felt iu every charge. 

Rev. L. W. Crawford was present iu 
the interest of the Advocate. The Advo- 
cate is a good paper and gaining favor 
with the people. 

Dr. J. C. Kilgo was present and deliv- 
ered a lecture on "Christian Educa- 
tion." It was a good presentation of his 
cause and so far as we could see there 
was nothing in it to which any state 
institution could reasonably take excep- 
tions. The doctrines of education 
taught by Dr. Kilgo have in substance 
been held by our church since its organ- 
isation. Whatever the doctor may have 
said iu the past, he certainly said noth- 
ing objectionable in this address. 

This is the fourth year for Brother 
Scroggs ou this district. It can be said 
without detracting in the least from the 
glory cf his predecessor that no man 
was ever more faithful in the discharge 
of his duty or enjoyed in a higher de- 
gree the respect of the people. If he has 
any other ambition than to do his duty 
he is remarkably successful hiding it. 

The preachers are all doing well. We 
believe that, to a man, they are faithful 
to Him who called them. Nothing 



more can be said to the praise of a Meth- 
odist preacher. 

The next session will be held at Lex- 
ington. 



Dr. Steal in the Far West. 

Dr. Steel has been in California. His 
sermons and lectures charmed and elec- 
trified those great soul d men ot the g.ext 
west. He has express&d iu strong terms 
his view of our work out there. He sa: s 
we should drop the word south from our 
name, appropriate hundreds of dj'la/s 
where we now appropriate one, bui'd a^.d 
endow colleges, etc. As to the suffix, 
we should not weep to se? it go. It is a 
misnomer. We may well ask what sort 
of a church is a south church, bui many 
of the westerners themselves till very 
dearly to this suffix. 

As to the larger appropriations, where 
will the money come from? This is ex- 
actly what every one there, an 1 ev vj on' 
who has ever been there, has s en and 
said. Occupy the centers has been th ? 
watchword, but still we don't do it, aid 
we don't see where the money is to come 
from. Must we lav aside our work in 
China, Japan, Korea, Bra il and Mexico? 
Our solutions should certainly be practi- 
cal. The western work is a problem. 
There is room and need for us therj now, 
and we are doing a great work. The nat- 
ural thing would be some agreement and 
adjustment, between the two juf.sdict.oas 
of Methodism in the United States by 
which we could avoid the occupancy 1 y 
both of the same field, whet' e." it b? smth 
or west. We look to the commiss'oa en 
federation for some good work on this line. 









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3 PHUNNIGRAPHS. ^ 

Figurative Prayer. 

A white minister, after conducting services at a colored 
church, asked an old deacon to lead in prayer. The brother 
in black offered a fervent appeal for the white brother and 
said : " O, Lord, gib him de eye ob de eagle dat he spy out 
sin afar off. Lay his hands to de Gospel plough. Tie his 
tongue to de line ob truth. Nail his ear to de Gospel pole. 
Bow his head way down between his knees, and his knees 
way down in some lonesome, dark and narrer valley where 
prayer is much want to be made. 'Noint him wid de kero- 
sene ile of salvation and sot him on fire. — Roanoke News. 



" You'll Know Him." 

A certain farmer lives in Northampton who is by no means 
noted for his resemblance to Apollo. He has a son eight 
years of age who possesses more wit than pedigree. One da}' 
a stranger came to the farm, and, seeing the lad, asked : 
" Sonny, where is your father ?" 

" In the pig pen," was the reply. And, as the man moved 
iu the direction indicated, the boy shouted : 

" I say ! You'll kuow him, 'cause he's got a hat on." 



Hard on the Mother. 

This went the rounds some years ago, and has receutl}' been 
revived by the Independent : 

A naughty boy one day eluded punishment by creeping 
under the bed, where his mother could not reach him. 
Shortly after his father came, and when told of the state of 
affairs, crawled on his hauds and knees in search of his son 
and heir. To his astonishment, he was greeted with the in- 
quiry : " Is she after you, too, father ?" 



Progress ! 

Old Job was taught to read by the minister's wife, and 
proved a very apt scholar. Returning home after a prolonged 
absence, the lad}' met her old pupil, and asked him how he 
was getting on. "I suppose you can read your liible now 
comfortable, Job?" "Lor, bless you, ma'am!" cried Job, 
" I've been out of the Bible and into the newspaper this long 
while." — Household Words. 



The mother asked little Dot to go into the next room and 
see if the clock was running, for she had not heard it strike 
all the afternoon. Dot came running back, put her curly 
head into the door and exclaimed : " Why, no, mamma, de 
lock ain't a-runnin'. It is des standin' still and a waggin' 
its tail." 

" What are pauses?" the teacher asked the first class in 
grammar. " Things that grow on cats and dogs," answered 
the smallest girl. 

The rescuer : " How did you to come to fall in ?'- 
The rescued : "I didn't come to fall iu; I came to fish." 
— Harper's Weekly. 

The old negro preacher clinched it this way : " You are 
splendid at singing and cau't be beat at praying. But when 
the ' Do Train ' comes along you don't get on." 



A country paper says : " A child was run over by a wagon 
three years old and cross-eyed." 



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CARPETS 



9 



Mattings, Linoleum, Shades, Etc. 

A C03IPLETE STOCK. 

Don't fail to See the many New Things 
we can show von. 

W. B. WILLIAMSON & CO., 

Furniture, Carpets, etc. 
16 Pattern Ave. ASHEVIL1TE, N. O. 



Asheville College, 

and Young Women, 

Offers College Courses with degrees; 

Seminary Courses with diploma, and 

Preparatory School of best type which admits 
to Wellesley on certificate. 

Music, Art, and Elocution Schools of highest 
order. 

Home Equipments 

Modern and Elegant. 



For particulars address the President. 

ARCHIBALD A. JONES, 

Asueville, N. C. 



THE EP W () RT II N K W 8 



3 



THE EPWORTH NEWS. 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY. 



GEO. L. HACKNEY, I 
Rev. T. F. MARR, ( 



Editors. 



Rev. D. ATKINS, D.D.. Associate Editor. 



SUBSCRIPTION BATES. 

One Year, in advance. 50cts 

six Months, in advance 25 *« 

Three Months, in advance 15 " 



Send subscriptions and address all communi- 
cations to the Publisher. 

GEO. L. HACKNEY, 

Asheville, N. C. 

This papre is edited by Dr. Atkins, the A'ssc- 
ciale editor. 



EDITORIAL. 

Cannibalism is on the increase in the 
Congo basin. 

• 

In India there are over 300,000,000 differ- 
ent deities worshipped. 

The Viceroy of China is reading the New 
Testament and Christian Literature. 

e 

The Soudan, with 60,000,000 people, is 
still without a single protestant mission- 
ary. 

• 

Italy has 500 Epworth Leaguers. They 
hold street meetings in hearing of the Vat- 
ican. 

Lucknow- Woman's college, a Methodist 
institution, is the first woman's college 
in all Asia. Miss Isabella Thobern Is the 
president. 

Under the direction of the Church Mis- 
sionary society sixty persons who cannot 
go themselves to mission fields are sup- 
porting as many who can go. Thus they 
labor together with one another and with 

God. 

■ 
Our prayers do not change God's pur- 
pose towards us or bring into existence any 
new love or grace, or bring. them nearer to 
us, but they fit us to receive and appro- 
priate to the fullest extent the abundant 
riches of the ever-present grace of our 

salvation. 

• 
It has been found impossible to con- 
struct a science of political economy with- 
out taking into account the ethical forces 
of mankind. The right and wrong of bus- 
iness must be considered, or rather the re- 
lation of all business to the master spirit 

of Jesus Christ. 

• 
Gifts to Trinity college last year 
amounted to $140,000. Of this $100,003 was 
the gift of Mr. Washington Duke as an en- 
dowment. It is proposed now fcr the 
alumni to build on the campus a Braxton 
Craven memorial hall. Rev. N. M. Jour- 
ney of the North Carolina conference, has 
offered $1,000 if $9,000 besides can be rais- 
ed. The rest of the alumni will sur.ly 

make that good. 

■ 
Mr. Archibald A. Jones, president of the 
Asheville College, was educated in [art 
in the University of Alabama. That fart 



and hundreds like it demonstrate the 
foolishness of the remark we sometimes 
hear that no body educated in a state 
school is any account to the church. Such 
remarks by Christian educators do the 
cause of Christian education much harm, 
aud serve no good purpose in establishing 
a higher standard of Christian educa- 
tion. 

• 

The staite is the people. If the dominant 
sentiment of the people is Mohammedan 
the state will be so. If Mormon, the state 
will be Mormon. If Christian, the state 
will be Christian. The assumption that 
government is necessarily secular in the 
sense of being anti-Christian is not only 
false, but dangerous. 
• 

The survival of the fittest, a necessary 
adjunct of the evolution, is but another 
way of expressing the old dogma of elec- 
tion and reprobation. It assumes the ne- 
cessity of creating a great many in order 
to have more to pick from the few he 
wants. It won't work in redemption. But 
God's plans are harmonious, therefore it 
wont work anywhere. 

• 

The best and safest revolutions are those 
which come gradually and silently. The 
kingdom cf God comes without observa- 
tion. 

There has been a great revolution in the 
faith of the church and the morals of 
the people. We are less attached to dogma 
and more to Christliness, and many evils 
are ostracized now, which once were al- 
lowed with impunity. 
• 

We have received a catalogue of Wea- 
verville college which is neat and hand- 
some job done by the Asheville Printing 
company. The catalogue stows an en- 
rollment last year of six seniors, thr L e 
juniors, thirteen in the sophomore class, 
thirty-five in the freshman class, and 171 
irregular and preparatory; in all 22S. 

The necessary expenses for board and 
tuition are from $108 to $125 fo:- the yeir. 

The course of study is substantial and 
quite advanced. There are five teachers. 
The buildings are ample for school pur- 
poses. Board is in private families. The 
moral and religious influence is e:c:-llent. 
There are three excellent literary societies. 
The prospects for next year are good. 
Write to M. A. Yost for catalogue, 
ft 

Beware of allowing your literary work 
to degenerate into mere games and p'ays. 
We say degenerate, for the purpose and 
the possibility of the literary work of the 
League is high. By means of it you may 
greatly elevate the taste and the life of 
your young people. But if you yield to 
the cry for something sensational, and 
substitute for it plays, etc., you will fail 
of your end. We do not condemn all 
games, but we do not see why they should 
ever form part of a League program. 
There is time enough and place enough 
for them at home. Occupy your precious 
time with something better. 

Again we repeat, beware of taking into 



your league persons who are not members 
of the church. Instance upon instance 
comes under our notice of the evil of this 
course. It is as sacred as the church and 
the standard should be kept up as high. 



The Mormons. 

Doubtless many of our readers have been 
under the necessity of looking upon a pair 
of Mormon elders within the last inoath or 
two. They have been strolling through 
the land, thrusting themselves in the 
homes cf our people, imposing their litera- 
ture upon us, and wherever they can find 
listeners, prclaiming some of their doc- 
trine. There are more that 2,000 cf them 
distributed in every state in the union, all 
under the authorities of Salt Lake. They 
claim to be out solely on a mission to 
save sinners, and think they should have 
the sympathy and support of the people. 
They uuchristianize all others and claim 
that every church is false, while they are 
the only true church. The Book ot Mor- 
mon they place on a par with the Bible, 
and claim to receive revelations now as 
authoritative as the Bible. 

Belief in the person aud mission of Jo- 
seph Smith .is a fundamental article of 
faith. 

Faith in and submission to the Mormon 
priesthood is essential to future hop;iness. 

They teach that Adam is God, and that 
Jesus Christ is his son by natural genera- 
tion. They have a plurality of gods, men 
becoming gods by practicing the trnets of 
Mormonism. They believe in polygamy, 
and though the practice is somewhat sus- 
pended, it is with them a sacred and eter- 
nal principle. 

It is a most corrupt aud blasphemous or- 
ganization. Their elders sh;uld receive no 
sympathy or encouragement. Many who 
have been caught in their net and gone to 
them have bitterly repented their folly. 
Have nothing to do with them, neither bid 
them God-speed. 



Systematic Giving. 

The most cf our giving is far too haphaz- 
ard and indefinite. If we should under- 
take to support the state as we support the 
church we would soon become bankrupt. 
It is a saying that nothing is surer than 
taxes. Taxes are levied proportionally 
and therefore justly. Every man pays to 
the support of the state as the Lord hath 
prospered him, that is in proportion to 
his ability. The church and all th? things 
of the kingdom are far more valuable to 
us than state government, since these 
things make possible a peaceful and happy 
government. We do not levy taxes for the 
church, but it is expected of men to tax 
themselves, make a voluntary offering, ami 
this should be done as systematically and 
proportionally as taxes. It would be the 
greatest step in advance we could take if 
all Christian people would set apart one- 
tenth of their income for the Lord. But 
we do not fix the ratio. Every man must 
do that for himself. By all means, how- 
ever, fix a ratio and keep it conscientious- 
ly. 

With this definite and certain income 
the church can plan intelligently and large- 
ly, both at home and abroad, and can push 
the gospel into the ends of the earth. Let 
us try it. Many are now doing so, and 
they like it. May it become the rule ra: It- 
er than the exception. 



T II E E P W O R T H N E Vf S 



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I Asheville District § 

Epworth League 1 

I Conference § 

The following is the program of the fifth annual Epworth 
League Conference of the Asheville District, Western North 
Carolina Conference, to be held at West Chapel, on the Swan- 
nanoa Circuit, on August 26 and 27, 1S97. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 26. 
Horning Session. 

10 o'clock — Devotional Exercises, conducted by Rev. J. 
M. Downmn. 

Organization and Election of Officers. 

Appointment of Committees. 

Address of Welcome — G. M. Garren. 

Response — Claud Felmet. 

Delegates report. 

Afternoon Session. 

2.30 — Prayer and Praise — Rev. J. A. Sronce. 

SPIRITUAL DEPARTMENT. 
The Devotional Leader (loniiu.) — Rev. Harold Turner. 
Revival Work iu the Chapter (15 min.) — Rev. E. L. Bain. 
General Discussion (20 min.) 
The Junior League (10 min.) — Miss Bessie Allen. 

DEPARTMENT OF MERCY AND HELP. 

How to Help the Poor so as to Prevent Improvidence (10 
min.) — Miss Irene McLoud. 

How to Visit the Sick (10 min.) — Miss Lula Williams. 

General Discussion (20 min.) 

The League as a Factor in Missions (10 min.) — Mrs. N. 
B. McDowell. 

SOCIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Social Life in the Church and How to Promote It (10 
min.)— Miss Terrie E. Buttrick. 

Prohibited Amusements— What Shall We Substitute for 
Them ? (10 min.) — Miss Nau C. Weaver. 

General Discussion (20 min.) 

Temperance and Civic Righteousness (30 min.)— Rev. 
Chas. W. Byrd, D.D. 

Brevard Epworth School (15 min.) — Rev. Fitch Taylor. 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 27. 
Morning Session. 

9.30 o'clock — Prayer Service — Rev. J. T. Henry. 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 
Books and Reading (10 min.) — W. K. Boyd. 
How to Manage a Reading Circle (10 min.) — Miss Grace 
Vaudiver. 

FINANCE. 

The Church Benevolences (10 min.) — J. C. Curtis. 

Christian Stewardship (10 min.) — Prof. Archibald A. 
Jones. 

Systematic Giving (10 min.)— B. T. Morris. 

General Discussion (20 min.) 

Department of Correspondence (15 min.) — Geo. L. Hack- 
ney. 

11-30 — Annual Sermon — Rev. M. A. Smith. 
Afternoon Session. 

2 o'clock — Reports of Committees. 

Where Shall We Hold Next Conference ? 

Adjournment for a Drive over the Biltmore Estate. 



subjects we have assigned leaders who we think will do jus- 
tice to them. This we have done irrespective of locality. 

Iu the plan that we have adopted it was impossible to 
place the name of every delegate on the program, but we 
have left twenty minutes under each topic for open discus- 
sion. We consider that time as belonging to the delegates 
for speeches of from three to five minutes in length. Let 
every one come to the Conference prepared to claim their 
time. We most earnestly desire a spirited discussion on all 
these interesting subjects. 

In reference to the drive through the Biltmore Estate, I 
must state that it is not absolutely c?rtain that we can get a 
pass. It has been promised provided nothing happens that 
would make it necessar3' to close out visitors on that day. 

Every one whose name appears on the program will 
please write to me at Buena Vista, N. C, at once, stating 
whether you will be there or not. 

Respectfully, 

GEORGE F. KIRBY, 

District President. 

From Granite Falls. 

Dear Bro. Hackney : Our League elected the following 
officers at last business meeting: A. C. Sherrill, President; 
J. A. Houck, first Vice-President; Mrs. D. H. Warlick, 
second Vice-President ; S. M. Carter, third Vice-President; 
Mrs. J. S. Hickman, Secretary; Miss Grace Teague, Treasurer. 
We have started a reading circle, and are now reading the 
Discipline. Will you please publish the list of books for 
reading course of '97, and give price for the set ? 

A. C. Sherrill. 

[The titles of the Epworth League Course of Reading for 
1S97-S, are as follows: "Sketches of Southern Writers," 
" Eminent Methodists," " Circuit of the Globe," " Foretokens 
of Immortality." This is the course which begins October 1. 
The price of the Course has not yet been fixed, but will be 
very shortly. — Editor Epworth News.] 

Death of Dr. Black. 

Rev. Dr. William S. Black, a member of the North Carolina 
Conference, and Presiding Elder of the Warrenton District, 
died last week in Raleigh, N. C. Dr. Black was sixty-one 
years old. He was born in Cokesberg, S. C, and entered the 
South Carolina Conference in 1S55. In 1S70 he was trans- 
ferred to the North Carolina Conference. During the war he 
was chaplain of the twenty-sixth North Carolina, was for six 
years the senior editor of the Raleigh Christian Advocate, and 
for three years superintendent of the Oxford Orphan Asylum. 
He was twice married. His wife and three children survive 
him. His death was due to heart disease and was so sudden 
that none of his children could reach him. 

In the death of Dr. Black the North Carolina Conference 
has suffered a great loss, as he was one of its most prominent 
members. He has occupied the chief places of influence for 
the past twenty 3'ears. 



LOCAL DOTS. 



We have taken pains to prepare this program for the 
League Conference. By reference to it you will find that it 
embraces every department of League work. To the several 



Rev. and Mrs. R. H. Parker of Lexington ate visiting their 
daughter, Mrs. G. A. Greer, in this city. 

We are very sorry to hear of the death of the infant child 
of Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Bowles of Henrietta. 

Rev. Dr: Chas. W. Byrd preached to the Confederate veter- 
ans at Maple Spring in this county last Sunday morning. 

We regret to learn that Rev. J. A. Sronce was prevented 
from attending the District Conference by the sickness of his 
wife. 

Rev. J. B. Hurley of Winston station has been visiting in 
the city. He preached a very attractive sermon at Central 
Church the first Sunday night iu August. 

Rev. R. D. Sherrill, formerly pastor of North Asheville, and 
wife are visiting friends in the city. We are glad to learn 
from him that the work is prospering in Waynesville. 

Asheville has been unusually favored recently with the 
ministrations of preachers of the first order. Bishop Wilson 
preached at Central last Sunday morning, and Rev. L. W. 
Crawford at night. Dr. J. C. Kilgo of Trinity College preached 
at Haywood Street. 

The Biblical Assembly is doing well. The services are 
edifying and entertaining both in the adult and juvenile 
schools. The night lectures have been of a high order. It 
is thought that the ministers' conference which commenced 
last Tuesday is the most profitable yet held. 



THE E P W O R T H N E W S 



Heditations. 

I have let my thoughts run over the 
field of mental culture — the need of ed- 
ucating the rising generation and pre- 
paring them for the duties and respon- 
sibilities of Christian citizens. I have 
seen fathers who lived hard and made 
sacrifices to educate a promising son. 
When educated he loved the saloou aud 
its associates better than books, wife or 
home. It is useless to say that money 
expended to educate him was wasted. 
All reasonable men must acknowledge 
that intoxicants ruin more men, cause 
more crimes, put more men in the peni- 
tentiary, cause more wives and mothers 
suffering, make more orphans, put more 
indigents in count}- homes, than all 
other causes put together ; and yet I 
hear some say that we must tax saloons 
to run public schools. Has it come to 
this, that we must use blood money in 
order to educate the poor? So far as I 
am individually concerned, I would pre- 
fer never to have a free school than 
have it supported by the tears of wid- 
ows, and hunger and starvation of the 
children of drunkards. Hunger leads 
to crimes, crimes to courts, and courts 
to heavy tax. The Jews would not put 
blood money in the treasury, and we 
boast of being better than the Jews, yet 
we not only use it, but legislate ways to 
produce it. Go to the home of the 
drunkard, see the wretchedness, want, 
miserj- and suffering, and then ask your- 
self the question, Am I in any way re- 
sponsible for this ruin? Did you vote 
for men in favor of saloons? If so, will 
not a just God hold you as particeps 
oriminus in this case? 

J. A. Reagan. 



They Will Fail. 

Certain newspapers in the State have 
" all of a sudden" joined in an attack 
upon President Kilgo of Trinity College. 
It is pretty clear they desire to run him 
out of the State, and to do this their 
plan is to sow distrust of him among 
the Methodist people, even if it is nec- 
essary to impugn his character. These 
papers seem to have all started at once 
and on the same key; it is easy to be- 
lieve that they all got word after the 
great victory at Morehead that the time 
had come to strike. Argument had 
failed ; old-time epithets must again be 
resorted to. Now all we have to say to 
these brethren of the press is, ihey will 
fiil, Every time they strike President 
Kilgo they strike Christian education ; 
aud every time they strike Christian ed- 
ucation they not only help solidify the 
Methodist people, but they help solidify 
all the Christian people in North Caro- 
lina; all of whom are rallying around 
President Kilg>. Christian education 



for Christians, is the battle-cry in North 
Carolina. All the cowards — we mean 
men who shirked duty when the war 
came — all bourbons, all the political 
tricksters, all the lobbying educators, all 
of them combined cannot stop the tide 
that is rising in North Carolina for Christ 
in education. A man as strong and true 
as Dr. Kilgo, a man who has a cause as 
noble and enduring as he has, can well 
afford to snap his fingers at the crowd 
who are seeking to pull him down. 
The}' will fail. They cannot touch him. 
The Christian mothers and fathers of 
North Carolina have learued that the 
Christian institutions are the only instu- 
tions for their sons and daughters. It 
will not be long before it is a thing un- 
heard of that a father who has faith in 
Christ will think of sending his son or 
daughter to an institution of learning in 
which Christ as an ideal for the students 
is not constantly upheld, aud His pre- 
cepts reverently impressed in the class- 
room. — Biblical Recorder. 



Sunday School Convention. 

The 15th Annual Convention of the 
North Carolina Sunday School Associa- 
tion will be held in Winston 011 the 24th, 
25th and 26th of this month. The con- 
vention will be attended by Mr. P. H. 
Bristow (a member of the International 
Executive Committee) superintendent of 
Calvary Baptist Sunday School, Wash- 
ington, D. C, who will deliver an ad- 
dress Tuesday evening, Aug. 24th, on 
the " Advance Line of Sunday School 
Work " and will conduct a Sunday- 
School Institute Session, Wednesday 
afternoou. Addresses will also be de- 
livered by Dr. Jno. C. Kilgo, President 
of Trinity College, and Prof. J. Y. Joyner, 
of the State Normal College. Other 
prominent Sunda}' School leaders will 
discuss topics of much interest to those 
engaged in or in touch with, the cause 
of Bible instruction. Entertainment 
will be provided for all delegates. Re- 
duced railroad rates will be secured over 
all transportation lines. 



The Qastonia League. 

Mr. Editor : The Junior Epworth 
League of the M. E. Church, South, 
Gastonia, N. C, was organized March 
7II1, 1S97, with eighteen members en- 
rolled. By the careful instruction of our 
manager, Mrs. B. E. Atkins, our League 
is becoming more interesting each day. 
The members are faithful and willing to 
do any work when called upon, and we 
hope by the help of God, to fill the 
measure of our organization as an Ep- 
worth League. We find great pleasure 
in reading The Epworth News and 
using it in preparing our League lesson, 
Wm, B. Morris, Sec. 



Church Music. 

It is uot easy to criticise church music. 
There are so many kinds of it that a shot 
fired in that direction is not liable to 
take effect in particular or in general. 
One extreme of the subject may be found 
in a country church of belated customs 
where there are no hymn-books in the 
pews, no instrument to help, and no one 
to lead the singing. The performance 
drags on in a monotonous discordant 
sort of way that furnishes neither pleas- 
ure nor inspiration. The other extreme 
may be found in some pretentious church 
where a paid choir absorbs most of the 
hour in a public exhibition of vocal 
gymnastics. There is no recorded evi- 
dence that the Lord takes pleasure in 
either one of these services. Public 
worship ought not to be either an enter- 
tainment or a punishment. The very 
first requisite of church music is that it 
shall be devotional. In order to this 
end the sentiment of the hymn is supe- 
rior to the mere music. It follows then 
that there is a failure just in proportion 
as the feeble words of a meaningless 
hymn are lost in a display of voice and 
the lofty sentiment smothered in a sea 
of sound. Emotions stirred by such a 
performance may be pleasant but hardly 
religious. 

We heard recently of a choir leader 
askiug the preacher to throw iu a prayer 
at a certain point so as to break up the 
monotony of the musical program. We 
need hardly say that the effect of reli- 
gious music is lost when it is of a char- 
acter all out of proportion to the capaci- 
ty of the congregation. We would 
laugh at a preacher whose sermon to an 
unlettered congregation is made up of 
philosophical statements and theologi- 
cal speculation. The choice perform- 
ances of the average choir are addressed 
to a half dozen musical experts in the 
audience and for the display of vocal 
skill. Too often those who are expected 
to inspire religious sentiment by their 
music are not themselves religious. 
The sermon ought to be scriptural, and 
the singing ought to be iu perfect har- 
mony not only with the sermon but with 
the entire service of devotion. — Central 
Baptist. 

Bright and Newsy. 
The Epworth League report of the 
Asheville District Conference, held at 
Weaverville last week, contained this 
paragraph: "We recommend the Ep- 
worth News, a bright, newsy semi- 
monthly published by Geo. L. Hackney, 
Asheville, N. C." 



If a man is inherently great God will 
uot let him die until he has had some 
opportunity to sho.v it. — J. P>. Haw- 
thorne. 



(5 



T H E E P W OKTH 



N E AY 8 



THE EPWORTH NEWS. 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY. 

GEO. L. HACKNEY, i FmTOR „ 
Rev. T. F. MAKR. \ bDITORS ' 



Rev. D. ATKINS. D.D.. Associate Editor. 



Sl'IiSORII'TIOX RATES. 

One Year, in advance 50cts 

six Months, in advance 25 " 

Three Months, in advance 



.15 



Send subscriptions and address all communi- 
cations to the Publisher. 

GEO. L. HACKNEY. 

Asheville, N. C. 

Asheville, N. C, August 15, 1897. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 

Rev. Plato Durham expects to atteud 
Union Theological Seminar}-. 

The infant child of Rev. and Mrs. H. 
L. Atkins of Charlotte died last Sunday 
and was interred at Siloam, Surry coun- 
ty, on Monday. 

J. E. Schoolfield, the evangelist, has 
sold his interest in the hardware firm of 
Schoolfield, Vass & Co., of Danville, Va., 
to Mr. W. P. Hodnett and will devote 
the whole of his time to evangelistic 
work. 

Normal life is an unselfish ministry to 
others. The Son of Man came not to be 
ministered unto, but to minister and to 
give his l'ife a ransom for many. Every 
other true man comes in the same spirit 
and unto the same end. 



It is impossible to too strongly empha- 
size the necessity ot leading the children 
to Christ in tender years. Pastors are 
specially called to this work. Pas. oral in- 
struction of children means this as we'.l 
as building them up in faith. 



It has been discovered by a writer in the 
Outlook that family religion is waning. 
Reasons given are early starts disturbing 
business and formality in the worship. 
People always find time for meals. When 
we come to believe that the life is more 
than meat, 'the soul more than the body, we 
can arrange for a season of live worship 
every day. Avoid formality and dryness. 



lu the Trinity College catalogue re- 
cently issued, the name of Rev. J. M. 
Downum is marked with an asterisk as 
dead. It is seldom a man lives to read 
his own obituary and we take pleasure 
in saying that this is a mistake. Bro. 
Downum is intensely alive and has no 
idea of " shuffling off this mortal coil " or 
some years to come. He is pastor of 
Bethel church, this city, and is doing 
good and faithful work. 



" The News and Hotel Reporter," this 
city, issued a very creditable " educa- 
tional number " last week. On the first 
page, however, we find this base fallacy: 

" There is no sin but ignorance." 
The author of these words, Christopher 
Marlow, was a free thinker and an athe- 



ist. He lived a reckless life and ended 
his miserable career in a saloon. If we 
were in the habit of giving gratuitous 
advice we would warn our friend, the 
editor of the Reporter, to be more careful 
in the choice of his selections. He will 
do more harm than good to the cause he 
espouses by giving prominence to such 
misleading statements. 



Asheville District Conference. 

The District Conference which was 
held in Weaverville, August 5th-Sth, was 
a most delightful and profitable occa- 
sion. It was well attended by delegates 
from every part of the district. All of 
the pastors were present except three. 
Two of these, Revs. J. A. Sronce and T. 
B. McCurdy, were kept away on account 
of sickness in the family. Rev. J. B. 
Hyder was in a revival. 

The reports from the work indicated 
progress. Bishop Key gave great satis- 
faction. His preaching was of a very- 
high order. The four sermons which he 
delivered will not soon be forgotten, and 
they will surely bear much fruit. In the 
social circle he is a delight and a bene- 
diction. His work in the three district 
conferences which he has attended, and 
his acquaintance thus formed with the 
work and the men will be very helpful 
to his administration at our annual con- 
ference. Dr. Kilgo was present and 
preached and delivered his address on 
education. Both his sermon and his 
address were much enjoyed. We are 
fortunate in this section that there is 
among us but little of that agitation and 
alignment on the educational question 
which is said to be so rife east of the 
mountain. Here we can admire Dr. 
Kilgo and hurrah for Trinity without 
suspicion of antagonizing other schools. 
We hope Dr. Kilgo's visit here may 
secure some students for the college and 
result in drawing us closer to Trinity 
College. 

Brother Crawford was present repre- 
senting the Advocate. He made a nice 
speech in which he set forth the purpose 
and policy of the paper as a peace maker 
and friend to every school and every 
good work in the state. We greatlv 
regretted that Brother Richardson could 
not be here. He was well represented 
by Rev. W. H. Belt, who displayed a 
good supply of books, and we hope left 
many of them in the place. 

Rev. K. C. Atkins, of Morristown, was 
a welcome visitor to the conference and 
greatly enjoyed mingling with his old 
friends, and preached to the great delight 
of many. 

The Lord's supper was administered 
Saturday morning after the setmon. 
There was a love feast held Sundav 
morniug and a young people's mass 



meeting Sunday afternoon, addressed by 
Revs. W. H. Willis and G. T. Rowe. 

Rev. James Atkins, D. D., was present 
as a member cf the conference and made 
an interesting and effective talk on the 
Sunday School literature. 

Weaverville gave elegant and ample 
entertainment, and greatly enjoyed the 
conference. 

The delegates to the annual confer- 
ence are : J. C. Curtis, Rev. J. A. Rea- 
gan, A. Cannon and R. P. Walker. 

C. M. Lance was licensed to preach. 
Harold Turner and W. A. Mitchell were 
recommended to the annual conference 
for admission on trial. 



riethodist Unity. 

There are not two Methodist Episcopal 
churches in the United States, but two leg- 
islative jurisdictions of the one church. 
In fact, there is only one Methodist church 
in the world. The doctrine and spirit is 
the same everywhere. There are many 
jurisdiction, one or two or three in Eng- 
land, one in Canada, two iu the Unked 
Sitates. 

These jurisdictions have been set off by 
legal enactments for sufficient reasons. 
Others are now desired, as in Japan and 
India. The central conference in India 
already has considerable legislative powers. 
Soon one will be needed, in Mexico, then in 
Brazil and after awhile in Africa. 

To be world-wide ,the Methodst church 
must have the power of subdivision. The 
ecumenical conference should be adjusted 
as the general bond of connection with 
supervising powers, and each jurisdiction 
allowed large liberty of legislation for lo- 
cal needs and conditions. 



President Archibald A. Jones. 

In a letter to the N. C. Christian Advo- 
cate, Rev. C. M. Bishop writes some excel- 
lent things of our new president of Ashe- 
ville female college. He says: "Mr. Jones 
assumed the presidency of Central college 
Mo., when it was near collapse andbrcughc 
it up to a first place among the colleges of 
Missouri. He has lofty ideas of education- 
al wofk, has the faculty of surrounding 
himself with the most accomplished in- 
structors. He is without exception the 
best disciplinarian I ever saw. » * * 
Knowing President Jones intimately as I 
do, having been his pas:or for two years, 
and knowing Asheville as I do, having 
been pastor there for two years also, I 
feel confident that the college there will 
enter upon a new career thax will even 
eclipse its noble past; and I b:iieve that it 
is easily among the possibilities thatitm.y 
grow in a few years into the greatest 
school for young women in the south." 

We are indeed delighted to have such 
nice things to record of Mr. Jones. From 
what we have seen of his plans a:id sp rit, 
we are ready to end:rse all this and more. 
We need such a school, and we earnes ly 
hope that Mr. Jones will meet with abun- 
dant success even at the beginning. 



T II E E P AY () R T H N E AY S 



< 



Brevard School — Help. 

The following letter speaks for itself 
and brings to light a worthy case where 
some help will do much. The writer of 
the letter is one of our pupils in theschool. 
Who will respond? 
Mr. Taylor: 

My brother has wanted me to write to 
you ever since I came home and told him 
how well I liked the school. He sees it 
has done me so much good, he thinks he 
would like to go tod if he can. 

He would write himself but he can't 
write. He wants to know upon what terms 
he can go next 'term He has no money to 
pay his way now, but says if somebody 
would help him, he would pay them back 
when he makes it, that he doesn't want to 
grow up and not know anything. He is 
fifteen years old and has not been to school 
worth anything. 

If you can help him or tell him any way 
he can get to go to school please let me 
know. If you can't, let me know for I 
don't see any peace with him, he wants to 
hear so bad. I worked until I got in 
school, and now I am going to wo.k unlil 
I get my oldest brother in school. The 
closest school to us is eight miles and he 
can't go so far and pay two dollars per 
month. Yours truly, 



This is only one of many who are hun- 
gering for knowledge and who are shut of 
from it by the circumstances of their life. 
What better outlay can one make than ti 
invest in that sort of life? This school is 
trying to supply such demands. We are 
dependent upon the good will and charity 
of those interested in such things. 



Licensing Vice, 

Of all the vicious things done by legis- 
lative and governing boards, the worst is 
licensing vice for the money that is in it. 

For a man who believes licensing, legal- 
izing saloons, is a good thing and proper, 
we have some pity. He is blind to the 
truth, and maybe not very capable of 
inoral distinctions. But when a man is 
capable and informed, and has convictions, 
and really thinks it a great wrong, votes 
for license because the city can't run with- 
out it, he becomes a veritable Judas, sell- 
ing his Lord, the virtue, the peace, the 
home life of his people for money with 
which to improve the city. He would 
build pavements with the hearts and virtue 
of his people, and he himself tiarnples on 
the highest principles and yields his her- 
oism at the crucial point. 

If a city can't run without the money 
from saloons, it ought to repeal its char- 
ter. It is never right to do evil that good 
may come. 

By keeping up a city with such m:ney, 
every citizen is forced into a moral alli- 
ance with the nefarious business, since 
these saloon men pay part of his legit- 
imate taxes. 

But it is said that it is better to regu- 
late them than to turn loose the blind 
tiger. Better a thousand blind tigers bear- 
ing the stamp of the outlaw, and coming 
under the execrations of all good people. 



than to legalize a business and give it an 
air of respectability, which thrives mo^t 
where people are ruined most, and whose 
the very business demands the greatest 
temptations placed in the way of the un- 
suspecting. These open saloons legalized 
are the death traps to young men, thous- 
ands of whom are caught every year, who 
would not come into the jiws of the blind 
tiger. The old toper and sot will get his 
drink somehow. We cannot legislate it out 
of him, but we can say to men, you shall 
not conduct a business which leads you 
to ply all your enticing arts to decoy 
and destroy our youths. If it is really true 
that their money is such a necessity to the 
city then we should help them get as many 
victims as possible, for the more drunk- 
ards, the more saloons and the larger in- 
come to the city. You can't escape the 
logic of this reasoning. The men who en- 
courage the saloons are helping make 
drunkards, and on the above hypothesis, 
the more the better. 



No Opposition to State Schools. 

The Concord Times heard Dr. Kilgo lec- 
ture on Christian Education in Concord, 
and says there was nothing in the address 
which the friends of the state university 
could object to, and that this is the identi- 
cal address which he has delivered at 
many places in the state. 

Dr. Kilgo heartily advocates Christian 
education, that is, education or character 
building on the basis of Christ's life and 
teaching, and the teaching of the Bible in 
schools. 

He admits the possibility of a school 
owned and controlled by the church being 
non-Christian, and implies that a state 
school, graded school, public school or pri- 
vate school may be Christians. In his strong 
way of putting things, he sometimes seem 
to intimate the Romish contention that 
all schools receiving state funds and run 
In the interest of all the people, are nec- 
essarily godless, and at this apparent in- 
timation many revolt. 

No intelligent Methodist will take the 
Mediaeval ground that state schools ate 
necessarily non-Christian. The Christian 
sentiment is so thoroughly inwrought, and 
the conquering Christ has made such ad- 
vances, that not only schools and colleges, 
but everything is coming gladly under his 
sway. In this country there is absolutely 
no reason why all our education should not 
be Christian in the largest and best sense. 
The advanced movement really means not 
only that this may be, but that it must 
be. 

Methodists are not going to fight the 
public schools. We look to them, if prop- 
erly managed, as the bulwark of our lib- 
erty, next to the church itself. The very 
same argument which demands public 
schools applies to technological schools and 
industrial schools. Nor do we sympathize 
with the sometimes expressed idea that 
higher education is a luxury. It is as nec- 
essary in its sphere as the elementary edu- 
cation, and needs as much the sympathy 
and support of all the people. None of us 



want a godless education anywhere, and 
we expect to contend earnestly for this 
faith unto the end; until the state uni- 
versity, all our state schools, public 
schools and all private schools, as well as 
all church schools, shall be Christian. The 
kingdom of heaven is like leaven which a 
woman took and hid in three measures of 
meal till the whole was leavened. Char- 
acter building or education in its entirety 
is to become learned with the Christly 
spirit. 

The Methodists have no merely personal 
ends to serve. They are not building 
colleges as an end, but as a means to the 
great end. They do not seek denomina- 
tional aggrandizement at the expense of 
other people, or at all as an end, but we 
are determined to do our part in furnishing 
object lessons of the right sort of edu- 
cation and in Christianizing the en ire field 
of education. We do this best at present 
by standing by our own, but we have the 
warmest good will to all others. D. A. 



The Difference. 

Editor Palmore, of the St. Louis 
Christian Advocate, thus describes the 
difference between the Northern and 
Southern girl : 

" When we see the average Southern 
girl, we general!)' feel like volunteering 
our services for protection, to see that 
no harm befalls her. When we see the 
average Northern girl, we feel like put- 
ting ourself under her protecting care, 
that she may see that no harm befalls 
us." 

Frank B. Miller 

INTERIOR 
DECORATOR 



Fine Wall Paper, 
Water and Oil Colors. 

Odd Fellows Building, 
16 Church Street, 

ASHEVILLE, N. 0. 

Phone 292. 

DEALER IN 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Wall 

Papers, Lincrusta - Walton 

Fresco and Relief Work. 



8 



T H E E P W R T II N E W S 



®Iw Dewtioiuil glwtiug. 



EDITED I5Y KEY. GEO. F. Kill 15V. A.M. 



TOPIC FOR AUGUST— ST. PAUL AS 
A HAN OF PRAYER. 



Aug. 1 5 — The Prayer at the Shipwreck. 



Acts xxvii, 23, 24. 

Since we left Paul taking leave of bis 
friends at Tyre, he has reached Jeruse- 
lum, been arrested, and taken before 
the Roman governor. Fearing injustice 
on the part of Festus he appealed to 
Caesar. Consequently we find him with 
other prisoners on shipboard making 
toward Rome. 

Paul was one of those master spirits 
before whom all men bow, and before 
the voyage ended he had become virtu- 
ally captain and commander. After en- 
tering into a place called the Fair Haven 
which is neai the city of Lasea, Paul 
foretold disastrous trouble ahead, but 
the Centurian believing the master 
of the ship more than Paul, ad- 
vised to depart. At first a fair wind 
blew, but afterwards a tempestuous wind 
arose and the ship was caught and could 
not bear up against the wind. It was 
under these circumstances that Paul 
comes to the front displaying his great 
genius for leadership. 

So great was the tempest that all hope 
of safety was lost. But Paul goes direct- 
ly to the one source of help, and, after a 
long time of abstinance, and commun- 
ion with the one whose voice the winds 
and the waves obey is assured that all 
will be well. 

How was Paul assured of this ? There 
was no may be, no supposition, no I 
think so, but I know. Paul says, "There 
stood by me this night the angel of 
God." He it was who came riding the 
storm and whispered in Paul's ear, 
" Fear not, Paul, thou must be brought 
before Caesar : and lo, God hath given 
thee all them that sail with thee." 
Paul's work was still unfinished. The 
grand hero of the cross must stand b-fore 
crowned heads, must establish the gos- 
pel in the imperial city. 

Mark the confidence with which Paul 
speaks. He does not talk as though he 
had a dream of doubtful interpretation, 
but lie speaks with authority, for he had 
gotten his information directly from 
heaven. " There shall be no loss of any 
man's life among you." The authority 
with which he spoke inspired the ship's 
crew with confidence. 

Notice in the 23d verse Paul's expres- 
sion, " God, whose I am and whom I 
serve." He acknowledges God's com- 
plete ownership. 1 am God's. But that 
is not all. Not only do I belong to God, 
but I serve him as a willing servant. 
No one can be a true follower of God, no 
one can belong to God who does not 
serve him. My reader, do you belong 
to God — are you his ? Are your hands, 
your teet, your mind, your time, your 
talent, your means his ? Can you say 
Willi Paul, "God whose I am?" Are 
you ready at all times lo do his bidding? 
Cm you say agaiu with Paul, " God 
whom 1 serve ?" 

Paul, so far as we know was the only 
Christian in thi- company, yet so great 



was his superiority and the superiority 
of his religion that he won all — " God 
hath given thee all that sail with thee." 
I think Paul must have counted this 
great compensation for shipwreck and 
privation. My dear Leaguers, if we 
belong to God and serve him, if we let 
the gospel light shine in us, God will 
give us those who sail with us on life's 
voyage. 



TOPIC FOR AUGUST 22. 



Paul's Prayer for the Churches. 



Rom. i, 0; I Thcss. i'li, 10-13; Heb. .xiii, 20, 21. 

St. Paul, like his Master, was pre-emi- 
nently a man of prayer. His epistles 
abound in passages of the deepest devo- 
tion and the loftiest spiritual aspiration. 
He commenced his Christian life with 
prayer — " Behold he prayeth " — and he 
lived and labored to the end in the 
atmosphere of prayer. No one who 
reads his writings with care can fail to 
be impressed with the frequency with 
which he appeals to his invisible Master 
as present with him while he writes. 
He spreads the parchment as it were 
before the Lord, and lifting up his soul 
in prayer to him he receives his message 
and in prayer writes it down. He makes 
us feel as we read his epistles that the 
Lord was constantly at his right hand. 

It would lie interesting and profitable 
to study the passages assigned us on this 
occasion as the vehicles of Paul's theol- 
ogy, but that would require more time 
and larger space than we have at our 
command. 

It was perhaps the purpose of the 
committee who assigned the topics and 
selected the texts to direct our thought 
chiefly to Paul's habit of praying for the 
churches which he had established with- 
out any special reference to the charac- 
ter of the petitions contained in his 
prayers. Taking this view we are im- 
pressed first of all with the fact that he 
prayed without ceasing. " For God is 
m}' witness, whom I serve with my spirit 
in the gospel of his Son, that without 
ceasing I make mention of yon always 
in my prayers. 

He recognized their constant need of 
divine help and blessing. There is an 
important lesson here for us. The 
church of God needs our prayers quite 
as much as the world of sinners, and in 
remembering it we should be constant 
and persevering. But we cannot pass by 
the prayer contained in the passage from 
Thess. without noting the burden of that 
prayer. 

i. The perfecting of their faith. The 
church of Thessalonica was remarkable 
for its faith, and Paul reminds them in 
another part of the epistle that he was 
comforted by a recollection of their 
faith, but he recognized the imperfec- 
tion which clings to the faith even of the 
best of God's people, and was anxious to 
see them that by earnest Christian 
instruction he might perfect them in 
Christian truth and give them a strong 
and confident hope. 

2. He prayed that they might increase 
in love. Love is assigned the place of 
pre-emminence among the Christian 
graces. It is the dominant trait of true 
Christianity. And while the Thessalo- 
uiaus had felt its pj.ver, t'.iey nee led 



that it should be kindled afresh in their 
hearts and burn with increasing fervor. 

3. He prayed that they might be estab- 
lished in holiness. Holiness of heart 
and life is the privilege and duty of 
every child of God. We sometimes 
underestimate the privilege of believers 
because of the fanaticism that has been 
propagated in the name of holiness. If 
there is a doctrine clearly taught in the 
Word of God, it is that believers may be 
and should be holy even as God is holy. 
Let us avoid all man-made methods of 
attaining this experience and pray con- 
stantly that God may lead us by his own 
spirit into this blessed experience of 
superiority to sin. 



TOPIC FOR AUGUST 29. 



Paul's Prayer for Himself. 



I Cor. xiv, IS; Acts xvi, 25; II Cor. xii, S. 

In our text from Corinthians Paul 
gives us two important rules to be ob- 
served in prayer. I. Pray with the 
spirit. Paul means that prayer is some- 
thing more than an intellectual opera- 
tion. Some of the most beautiful and 
finished prayers we have ever heard, so 
far as the language and deliver}- were 
concerned, have been the most powerless 
and some of the most crude and illogical 
in form have been the most powerful. I 
once witnessed the answer to a prayer of 
one sentence offered by a timid, uncul- 
tivated Christian man, in which the 
whole congregation was overwhelmed 
with the power of the Holy Spirit, and 
sinners convicted, penitents converted 
and believers made to rejoice. 

2. Pray with the understanding. 
Meaningless ejaculations are not prayer. 
The repetition of stereotj-ped formulas is 
not prayer. Prayer should spring from 
the reason, and be adapted to the occa- 
sion on which it is offered and should 
intelligently represent the wants of him 
who prays at the throne of grace. 

Our second passage taken from Acts 
14 : 25 gives us an account of the praying 
of Paul and Silas in the Philipian jail. 
The circumstances uuder which they 
prayed were peculiarly painful and dis- 
tressing. Here we learn to go to God 
with our severest trials and deepest dis- 
tresses. The words of their prayers are 
not recorded, but we can readily conjec- 
ture the subjects of them from the an- 
swer they secured. While they prayed 
an earthquake prevailed, the prison 
doors were opened, the fetters of the 
prisoners were broken, and the jailer 
was convicted of sin and converted to 
God. 

The third passage II Cor. 12 : 8 has 
reference to the thorn in the flesh expe- 
rienced by Paul. We have no account 
what it was. Man} - indeed have been 
the conjectures in reference to it, but no 
one has ever been able to discover what 
the peculiar nature of the affection was, 
and we need not waste our time with 
theories about it. All we need to know 
is that Paul made this physical affliction 
a subject of prayer. And while the 
prayer for its removal was not answered 
the spirit of his prayer was answered in 
the bestowal of the needed grace to bear 
it. Goil answers our prayers in his own 
way, and we should be thankful that he 
does, (or he is all-wise and k;i )vvs what 
i.i best. 



T H E E P W O R T H N E W S 







THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

Time Table. 

In Effect June 20. 1897. 



SNO. 15. 

0:25am 

9:45am 

2 : 30pm 

2:35pm 

3:40pm 

<J:3Spm 

G:4apm 

■8 :55pm 

7:12pm 

S :15pm 

J:55pm 

S:lSpm 

fi :40pm 

0:15pm 

9:30pm 

9:46pm 

iO :02pm 

10:35pm 

10:53pm 

VI :04am 

42:12am 

.12:17am 

1:29am 

3 : 00am 

4:00am 

4:05am 

6:39am 

7:40am 

1:35pm 



NO. 16 



(Central Time.) 

Lv Norfolk 

Lv Pinner's Point 

Ar Selma .... 

Lv Selma .... 

Lv. .. .Raleigh 

Lv Durham ... 

Ar ..Greensboro.. 
Lv ..Greensboro .. 
Lv ..High Point.. 
Ar Salisbury (ET) 
Lv Salisbury (CT) 
Lv .. .Cleveland .. 
Lv ..Statesville .. 

.Newton 

..Hickory ... 
Lv Connelly Sp'gs 
Lv ..Morganton .. 

...Marion .... 

..Old Fort ... 

..Biltmore ... 

..Asheville ... 

..Asheville ... 

Hot Springs . 

Morristown .. 

..Knoxville .. 

.Knoxville ... 

.Cleveland ... 
Ar .Chattanooga . 
Ar ..Nashville . .. 



Ar 5 
Ar 5; 
Lv 12 
Ar 12 
Lv 11 
Lv 10 



Lv 

Lv 



Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Ar 
Ar 
Ar 
Ar 
Ar 
Lv 
Lv 



Lv 
Ar 
Ar 
Lv 
Ar 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 3 
Lv 3 
Lv 2 
Lv 1 
Lv 1 
Ar 1 
Lv 12 
Lv 10 
Lv 9 
Ar 9 
Lv 7 
Lv 6 
Lv 12: 



25pm 
05pm 
50pm 
45pm 
45am 
52am 
50am 
25am 
20am 
10am 
00am 
3Sam 
16am 
39am 
23am 
06am 
49am 
15am 
55am 
51am 
44am 
39am 
23am 
55pm 
50pm 
55pm 
19pm 
20pm 
25pm 



EASTBOUND 


6 


12 




8:30am| 4:05am 


Lv Knoxville 


....12:05pm 


8:25am 


Lv Morristown 


1:25pm 


9:50am 


Lv Hot Springs .. 


3:15pm 


11:46am 


<Vr Asheville 





38 



Lv Asheville | 1 : 25pm 

Lv Biltmore | 1:35pm 

Lv Round Knob i 2:35pm 

Lv Marion | 3:32pm 

Lv Morganton | 4:11pm 

Ar Hickory | 4:50pm 

Ar Newton | 5 : 08pm 

Ar Salisbury | 6:40pm 

Lv Salisbury 9:36pm| 8:15pm 

Lv Greensboro 10:44pm| 9:52pm 

Ar Danville 12:00am|ll:25pm 

Ar Lynchburg l:58aml 

Ar Charlotteville 3:35am| 

Ar Washington 6:42am| 

Ar Baltimore 8:00am 

Ar Philadelphia 10:15am| 

Ar New York 12:43pmj 

Ar Richmond | 6:00am 

Ar Durham j 5:30am 

Ar Raleigh j 7:10am 

Ar Go ldsb oro | 1:10pm 

WESTBOUND 



11 



37 



Lv Goldsboro 4:45pm| 

Lv Raleigh 2:00am| 

Lv Durham 3:30am| 

Lv Richmond 2:00am| 

Lv New York | 4:30pm 

Lv Philadelphia j 6:55pm 

Lv Baltimore | 9:20am 

Lv Washington |10:43pm 

Lv CharloLtesville | 1:55am 

Lv Lynchburg | 3:45am 

Lv Danville 6:05am| 5:50am 

Lv Greensboro 7: 32am | 7:05am 

Ar Salisbury 9:37am| 8:17am 

(Central Time.) 



Lv Salisbury 8:55am| 

Ar Statesville 9:46am| 

Ar Newton 10: 26am j 

Lv Hickory 10:47am| 

Ar Morganton ll:2sam| 

Ar Marion 12:12pm| 

Ar Round Knob 12:50pm| 

Ar Biltmore 2:15pmi 

Ar Asheville 2:25pml 

Lv Asheville 2:30|jml 

Lv Hot Springs 3:52pml 

Lv Morristown 5 :55pm I 



NO. 5. 
6:15am 

7:39am 
9:30am 



Ar Knoxville 7:40pmjll:00am 



Ar Chattanooga 11: 35pm j 7 

Ar Nashville 6:45am 6 



40pm 
:45am 



MURPHY BRANCH 17 Mixed 67 



Lv Asheville . . . 
Lv Waynesville 

Ar Balsam 

Ar Bryson City 
Ar Andrews 
Ar Tomotla .... 
Ar Murphy 



40pm| 9 
OSpmlll 
30pm|12 
40pm| 3 

I 6 
I 7 
i S 



00am 
30am 
15pm 
30pm 
:45pm 
:37pm 
:00pm 



Lv Murphy 

Lv Tomotla 

Ar Andrews .... 
Lv Bryson City 

Lv Balsam 

Lv Balsam 

Lv Waynesville 
Ar Asheville .. . 



18 Mixed 6 6 
0am 

50am 
:20am 

40am 
:30pm 

35pm 

:15pm 

5pm 



4: 
4: 
5: 
8: 

20am 1 11: 
05am|12: 
30am| 1: 
Olpmj 3: 



A. 


.AJS., 

' Ashs 


ROAD. 


10 


14 




8 


L\ 


ville .. 2:05pm| 7 
(Eastern Time 


20am | 


8 


00pm 




.) 







Lv Asheville .. 3: 05pm | 8 
Lv Biltmore ... 3 :15pm I 8 
Lv Hen'sonville 4:00pm| 9 

Lv Tryon 5 : 00pm 1 10 

Lv Spart'b'g .. 6:0Spm|ll 

Ar Union 7:15pm|12: 

Lv Alston 8: 53pm i 2: 

Ar Columbia ...9:3opm| 3: 



20am | 9 
28am I 9 
lSam| 9 
20am|ll 
2Sam|12 
45pm| 
45pmi 
35pm| 



00pm 
10pm 
5Spm 
02pm 
10am 



(Central Time.) 



Ar Savannah ...5: 00am | 
Ar Jacksonville 9:10am| 



J. M. CULP, Traffic Mgr., Washington. 
W. A. TURK, S. H. HARDWICK, 

Gen'l Pass. Agt. Asst. Gen. Pass. Agt 
Washington, D. C. Atlanta, Ga. 
C. A. BENSCOTER, Assistant General 

Passenger Agent, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
F. R. DARBY, C. P. & T. A., Asheville. 



Kimball Pianos 



This ie the only Piano that is 

fitted with a continuous 

bridge. 



Call and see them. 

Double quick action! 



Sent via your address on a postal. 

will obtain much valuable 

information about 

Pianos & Organs. 

Hough & Dunham, 

11 Church street, 
ASHE\ ILLE, X. C. 



35 Volumes 7,500 Illustrations 28,600 Pages 

Complete and Up tO Date The largest American Cyclopedia-Pronounces all Titles 
—Volumes of Handy Size— Furnishes the Largest and 



Latest Maps— Includes an Unabridged Dictionary— Information Right Down to Date— You can 
keep up Lo the times by adding an annual each year. *#* No other Cyclopedia even pretends to 
claim these features, but don't you think they are pretty important? Send us your name and let 
us show you iu detail the various points of superiority possessed by The Columbian. It covers 
the whole range of knowledge; is prepared by the most able and experienced editors and cyclo- 
pedia writers, and is commended by the best judges throughout the country. 

TtlP Best FamilV LlbraPV Because it is clear and simple in language, free from tech- 

nicalities, non-partisan and non-sectarian, and above all- 

Neither "BritUV nor Sectional, but THOROUGHLY AMERICAN. A work of refer 
euce which is foreign or narrowly sectional has no place in an American home. Sold on easy 
terms of payment. GARRETSON, COX & CO., Publishers, Buffalo, N. Y. 

For full descriptive circulars and terms send to our Southern Agents, 

THE COLUMBIAN BOOK CO.. 81 Whitehall Street. Atlanta. Georgia 





Over 4.003 vacancies— several times as many vacancies as members. Must have more 
members. Several plans; two plans give free registration; one plan GUARANTEES positions. 
10 cents pays for book, containing plans and a S500.00 love story of College clays. No change lo 
employers for recommending teachers. 

SOUTHERN TEACHERS' BUREAU, J REV, DR. O. SUTTON, A.M 

S. W. Cor. Main & 3d sts., > President and Manager. 

Louisville, Ky. ) 
Northern vacancies Chicago office, Southern vacancies Louisville office 
both offices. 



, j < 



utTon teachers' bureau, 
69-71 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



10 



T II E E P W ( ) K T H N E W 8 



Trinity College 



NEXT SESSION OPENS 
SEPTEMBER Sth. 



Three full courses of study. 
Large number of electives. 
Two full chairs iu English. 
Womeu admitted to all 
classes. 

One Hundred and One 
Thousand Dollars 



added to the endowment 
during the present year. 
Only male literary college 
in North Carolina that is 
located iu a city. 

The best business course 
offered in the state. Send 
for album and catalogue. 



Address, JNO. C. KILGO, 

Durham, Durham, N. C. 



GREENSBORO 

FEMALE COLLEGE, 

NORTH CAROLINA. 



The Fifty-Second Session of this 
College begins 

Wednesday, Sept, 8, 1S<)7. 



Advantages of College and Conservatory 
offered at moderate cost. 



A Faculty of Specialists 



AMPLE EQUIPMENT. 
A PLEASANT HOME. 



Catalogue on application. 



India's Representative. 

The Rev. Dr. Crane attended the Lea- 
gue convention and made an inspiring 
speech. In speaking of the fearful suf- 
fering in India he said: 

"I come from India, fresh from the 
city smitten of plague and fields devas- 
tated by famine; I come with a heart 
burdened with the sorrows of millions 
of people. Here our land is groaning 
with the harvest, but there 50,000,000 of 
people are wondering when help will 
come to them. Much has been done; 
streams of benevolence have been opeu- 
ed, and yet the destitution continues, 
and indeed increases. Homes are deso- 
late, and orphans are left to the tender 
mercy of the wicked; mothers press 
skeleton babes to shrunken breasts. 
These sufferings, however, are only re- 
presentative of the spiritual starvation 
which exists. Iudia stretches out her 
hands for the Bread of Life. That land 
needs bread, but, far more than this, it 
needs the Gospel of Christ. Oh Epworth 
Leaguers, dwellers in this favoured 
land, your brethren are praying that ye 
may hear the Macedonian cry: 'Come 
over and help us !' " 




I>Rl<:i> PEACOCK, President. 



Mr. Editor: During these dark nights 
I have been looking on the other side 
of folks and I saw : 

Church members in a deep stud)- while 
the collection was being taken. 

Some church members who attend 
church so little that they look like they 
are ashamed when the)' do go. 

Brethren and sisters who have about 
enough religion to insult the church 
collector when he is collecting dues. 

Brethren who have to be handled like 
glassware- " with care," and thev have. 
to be warmed up before they will work. 

Oi,d-Mak-in-the-Moon. 



"Well?" said the clerk to an Irish- 
man who pointed to a pile of soap. " I 
want a lump of that," answered the 
Irishman. " Will you have it scented 
or unscenled !" " I'll take it wid me." 



Weaverville College 



Weaverville, N. C. 

An elegant new building containing 
seveu rooms has been added, and the old 
building has been remodeled with a new 
front. There are fifteen acres of land, 
which, wheu improved, will afford am- 
ple aud beautiful grounds for the cam- 
pus. 

The location of Weaverville is one of 
the finest in the South, high elevasion, 
pure water, health record unequaled, a 
community of moral and religious citi- 
zens. No Saloons. 

A telephone line connects Weaverville 
with Asheville. 

Weaverville offers full courses in Sci- 
ence, Mathematics, Ancient and Modern 
Languages, English Literature, History, 
Music and Art. 

Expenses for a year range from $100 
to #125. 

The next session opens Sept. 8, 1S97. 

For full information, send for cata- 
logue. 

M. A. YOST, President. 

J. E. RHEIM, Secretary. 



BelwooH Institute, 

Belwood, N. C, 

Opus Am. 10th, '97, 9 i in. 



Four large buildings. Chapel 
40x60 feet. No physician last 
vear among the 165 students. 
Discipline mild, but firm. Stu- 
dents board in the halls with the 
principals. Faculty of five. All 
graduates of leading North Car- 
olina and Virginia Colleges. 
Special Business Department 
under the management of a 
graduate of Smithdeal Business 
College. 

Board in Halls $6 per month. 
In private families from $6 to #7. 

Tuition from $1 to $3 per 
mouth. Book-keeping for regu- 
lar students, 50 cents extra. 
Music $2. 50 per month. Health 
of the community very good, 
both morally aud physically. 

For further information aud 
catalogue, address 



ALDBIDGE & CRAVEN, 
Principals. 



THE EP WORTH NEWS 



11 



(fynmUxty fretting*. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT. 

THIRD ROUND. 

O. ATKINS P. E., WEAVERVILLE. N. C. 

TJrevard, Pine Grove July 31, Aug. 1 

Weaverville, Salem Aug - . 12, 13 

Sulphur Spring's, Balm Grove " 14,15 

Leicester Camp Ground " 21, 22 

Spring Creek, Spring Creek....' " 28,29 



Spiritual Fruit Bearing. 

How may I be spiritually fruitful ? 
When a soul earnestly seeks such knowl- 
edge the desire of the heart will surely 
be fulfilled, for " Blessed are they that 
do hunger and thirst after righteousness 
for they shall be filled." Christ gave 
the key to fruitfulness in the parable of 
the vine and branches, John xv, when 
he said, " He that abideth in me and I 
in him, the same bringeth forth much 
fruit." Lay emphasis upon "abide in 
me" and "much fruit," for therein we 
see cause and effect, /-nd what is it to 
abide in Jesus ? and how shall I meet 
this condition ? 

Abiding in Christ is maintaining a 
right attitude toward him. We may, if 
we are truly regenerated we will have 
seasons at least when we take this right 
attitude. But it is God's will that we 
should keep in this attitude. This truth 
is beautifully set forth and illustrated in 
I Cor. 3:9," Ye are God's husbandry." 
This is a parable in concisest language. 
Naturally we are like soil of the great 
American desert, which has to be irre- 
gated before it can produce a harvest. 
Christ reclaims the soul which trans- 
forms the barren desert into a blooming 
garden. The Holy Spirit is the cleans 
iug flood which irregates the son, the 
Word of God is the seed, and by chas- 
tisement and persecution, as well as by 
the Word of truth, the divine husband- 
man cultivates his garden that it may 
bring forth much fruit. To work this 
transformation within the believer is the 
plau of God and the passion of Jesus 
Christ. But unlike the barren desert of 
nature we can elect whether or no this 
work of God within us goes on or is sus- 
pended. See Phil. 2 : 12-13. The atti- 
tude of abiding is to yield the soul, the 
whole nature and life into the hands of 
Christ, to let him perform this work 
which he so longs to do. The right 
attitude is one of a surrendered will, 
submissive to the Father's appointments 
whether they come as clouds or sun- 
shine, and obedient to the call of Christ; 
an attitude of devotion and praise, of 
trust and watchful prayer, lest we grieve 
our Lord, and hinder his hoi}' purpose 
to make us happy and useful. 

" El Spirito Santo." 




Olt 

Is lo do it. 



We do it 

and we 

do it well. 
Of course you know 
what we mean. 

Everybody is pleased 

with our work. 
Send your 
next Laundry 
to us. 

ASHEVILLE STEAM LAUND.RY 

J. A. NICHOLS, Proprietor, 
43 West College st. Ashkville, n. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

AND 

COLPORTAGE AGENCY. 

I solicit orders from all cur 
i Sunday Schools and Churches for 
all supplies of Hymn and Song 
Books, Sunday School Literature, 
Libraries, Bibles, Record Books, 
etc., etc. 

I can supply the Holman Self 
Pronouncing, the International, 
the Oxford and othur Teachers' 
Bibles as low and often lower than 
you will find them elsewhere. 
Also family and smaller hand and 
pocket Bibles and Testaments. 
The life of Dr. Chas. F. Deems at 
$1.50 just out. The Young Peoples 
new Sunday School song books, 
note addition at $3.60 per dozen, 
post paid, either round or shaped 
note. Word addition $1.25 per 
dozen, post paid. 

Any proper book furnished, no 
matter where published. 



N. R. RIGHARDSON, 



High Point, N. C. 
Colporlage Agent of the W. N. C. 
Conference of the M. E. Church, 
South. 



A Great Harvest for Agents. 

Holiday Sales Over 25,000 in One Mouth. 




These new Books are selling- faster 
and doing' more good Vlian any other 
religious books on the market. The 
Children's Edition has 128 pages, 
fully illustrated with 42 large new 
cuts, size (5x8 inches. Price in heavy 
board covers, 35 cts. Cloth, (30 cts. 
Large Edition, cloth, 320 pages, 
price, Sl.OO. AGENTS MAKING 

FROM $20.00 TO $30.00 PER WEEK. 



ALES 10,500 PER MONTH. 



A little giri, 13 years ok 1 ., made $7.oG in one clay. A crippled boy made $40.00 in two 
wee'ks. A man made $12.50 in one day. Another ^31.00 in one week. Another $40 00 in 
eight days. Another made $127.00 in fifteen days, and other agents have had equal 
success. It makes little difference whether you have had experience as an n.ger.t or 
not. Fairly presented, these books will sell themselves. Everybody will 
want them. 

From tire multitudes of testimonials we quote just a few: 

Central Congregationalist: "Many of the incidents are exceedingly pathetic, and 
can scarcely fail to stir any tender heart to tears. 

The Union Signal, organ of the W. O. T. U.: "This hook is neither doctrinal hot 
denominational, yet distinctly Christian. Its high religious tone, its fascinating spirit 
and the high rank of its contributors make it a strong faith tonic and an inspiration U 
prevailing prayer." 

Michigan Christian Advocate: "The larger issue of this work has been widely cir 
dilated and read. This cheaper edition (illustrated) contains such selections as are cal 
culated to interest and instruct children. The incidents are very pathetic." 

Write at once for terms to A«ents. Be early in the field. A copy of cm . 
hook is all the outfit needed. These will be sent, postpaid, on receipt of price, and h" 
of this amount will be credited to your account as soon as you order half a dozen ' 
more books. Write at once to 

S. B. SHAW, Publisher, 25 Canal St., Grand Rapids, Mici 

£JF" We ship books from Cincinnati. Ohio. Mention this paper when you write 
oyyeial inducements to Sunday Schools that want books. 



12 



T II E E P W R T II N E AY 8 



Racket 
Store 
ws 




30 South Main St. 
ILLE, N. C. 



Wo have secured a e;reat Job ii 



Bagster's Comprehensive Teachers' 



Self-pronouncing, which is worth to the Bible student 
more than we ask for the Bible. It is in large clear 
type, flexible leather binding. Size, 6 x 8 inches when 
closed. Usually sold for about if3.00. Our price, while 
they last, is $1.25. If by mail, add 25 cents. 

J. M. STONER. 



an we help pu 



these hard times to make your hard- 
earned dollars do extra duty ? 

We thiuk we can — in fact we know 
it, if you respond promptly. 

I per ceni. discount 

on our excellent lines of Clothing, Shirts and 
Drawers, Neckwear, Half Hose, Collars and Cuffs, 
Hats, Caps and Misses' and Children's Low-Cut 
Shoes. 

Besides we have placed clearing out 
on a number of seasonable things in 
departments showing reductions of 
thirty per cent. 
One word more, please : The special sale 
will last but a short time, so don't blame 
us if yon wait a trifle too long to reap the 
advantage. 

H REDWOOD & CO. 



prices 
other 
about 



Jeweler. 



Souvenirs, North Carolina Gems. 



Eastman's Pocket Kodaks 
and Bull's Eye Kodaks 
and Supplies. 



lo. 27 PATTOM AVENUE. 



R & COMPANY 



One of the greatest Clearance Sales ever known to 1 the Asheville public is now in 
full blast at our store. Matchless Bargains prove the trade-winners. 



Good Lawns, Solid Colors ... 4c 10c Fancy Crepon 4c 10c Empress Crojonettes 51c 



All 11.1c and 12Ac Percales . . ,,S- : '.c 41in lUe Dimities 7-ic 

llin Grass Linen, 2»r goods . ,l')c ]»<■ Emb. Ohambrays Tie 

15c Cashmere Imperial. ... 7-ic 10c Douhle Fold Dress Plaids. 6^c 



5c Cambric Skirt Lining 2.'c 

10c Best Silesia T'.c 



All other Goods at Proportionately Low Prices. 



CHER & COMPANY 







The Stranger. 

There are two sides to every question, 
and — to every stranger. That is to say, 
the newcomer to the church and League 
ought to be greeted and ought to greet. 
Of course, if he be neither Christian nor 
church member, one expects him ifoo stand 
in the place of strangers. But for any one 
who has named 'the name of Christ to get 
huffy because "no one spoke to me" is an 
indication of something wrong. Whose 
house are you in? Their Father's house? 
No. You must change the pronoun to 
first person possessive. "My Father's 
house." Then, you, too, are one of the 
host, with yo'ur brothers and sisters in 
Christ. What if that church-member 

nearest you forgets to speak? Hold out 
your hand as if you were at home and 
speak the greeting that becomes the hour. 
You cannot? Then we w r ill itell you what 
is the matter: You did not learn to do this 
when you were at home and some one else 
was the stranger. "Charity seeketh not 
her own." The greeting in a new church 
home is your due, your "own." Seek it 
not. Greet some one else, and note how 
quickly 'the home feeling" comes. — Ep- 
worth Herald. 



then put a little intelligent study into it. 
One young man or woman with a clear 
idea of whalt to do, and a firm purpose to 
do it, can create enough interest in any 
church to make the league a success. You 
need to have faith in God and some spinal- 
ity, and resolve to achieve success. Try 
again; and if then you don't succeed, why 
— try again.— Epworth Era. 



then ensued. Mates being secured, the 
happy couple then sat down to solve the 
query. When all the questions were 
"matched" the president called the mem- 
bers and the answers were given. Those 
who failed to make answer were served to 
special refreshments at an* "all-fools" ta- 
ble. 



* 



The Usher. 

We read recently of a church in which 
the ushers aie supplkd with cards. When 
a stranger is seait'ed the ushor hands a card 
to a member of the church near by. On 
the card is written : 

The person I have just ushered into a 
pew near you is a stranger. Be sure to 
greet him (or her) at the close of the ser- 
vice with a cordial grasp of the hand and 
a warm invitation to come and worship 
with us again. By request of the pastor 
and church committee. 



It's Wrong ! 






Try Again. 

It is easy to start a League. The troub- 
le is to keep it going. Many run well for 
a while, then the interest dies down, and 
the league ceases. That is true of nearly 
everything, so it need not surprise or dis- 
courage us. Let us try again. See if we 
cannot revive the languishng league. Try 
new plans. Be in earnest. Resolve that 
the work shall go ahead. Put a little en- 
thusiasm into it. Maybe it never had any. 
If the trouble was that it had nothing e'.se, 



Back Seats. 

A back seat may be as comfortable as 
any in the room, but whisperers, seorners, 
church-loafers, light-headed girls, and toft 
brained boys always seek that place. A 
'thoroughly relgious Epworthan who wan s 
to make every meeting a success is not 
afraid of the front seats. Backsliding in 
heart is often accompanied by backslipping 
in seat. — Exchange. 



Sliced Questions. 

Berean Chapter, Camden, O., tells of a 
pleasant social evening spent with sliced 
questions. Plainly written on card-board 
were questions on church history, Epworth 
League work, and current events. The 
slips were cut in two and indiscriminately 
distributed. A merry hunt for other halves 



* 

. ..... . * 

-»^»-^»-^»$»-^$*--^»-*$*--»^»-<t> <t > -»^» -»h>- ■»>> <t> <t> ■»> > ■»$♦--» ;£> » : ♦ > -«$»-■«$»■ -*$»•-* >> « :t> ■*$»'-«$»"«$»- < t> <i> <t> <t> 



In teaching the lesson recently 
on the second coming of Christ in some 
way the question of modern amusements 
came up and some of the scholars of the 
class took the position that it was no 
harm to go to the theatre or to play 
cards at a whist part)* or to go to the 
ball, etc. The faithful teacher waited 
until the scholar had stated his position 
and then asked : 

"Do you believe that Christ is com- 
ing again ?" 

" Yes." 

" Do you know when ?" 

" No; he may come at any time," an- 
swered the scholar. 

" Well, suppose he came to-morrow 
night would you like him to find you in 
a ball room, or theatre, or bar room, or 
by the card table ?" 

With head bowed the scholar answer- 
ed, " No." 

But if he came, would you like him to 
find you doing good, in his service, in 
prayer, in praise, in glorifying his Holy 
Name ?" 

"Yes." 

With this impression made, the teach- 
er laid down this rule to his class : " Live 
every dav like that day was the last." 



* 



* 



* 



THE EPWORTH NEWS 



FURNITURE 




Look Out! 



CARPETS, 

Mattings, Linoleum, Shades, Etc. 

A COMPLETE STOCK. 

Don't fail to See the many New Things 
we can show you. 

W. B. WILLIAMSON & CO, 

Furniture, Carpets, etc. 
16 I'atton Ave. ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



AsIigyiIIg College, 

For Girls and Young Women, 

Offers College Courses with degrees; 

Seminary Courses with diploma, and 

Preparatory School of best type which admits 
to Wellesle) r on certificate. 

Music, Art, and Elocution Schools of highest 
order. 

Home Equipments 

Modern and Elegant. 

For particulars address the President. 

AltClflliAED A. JONES, 

Asbeville, N. C. 



The upper half of this column 
belongs to Alexander & Court- 
ney and the lower half to the 
Bon Marche. Both these firms 
will have important Advertise- 
ments in the next issue. 



Loo 




T H E E P W O R T H N E W S 



tlbe £pwortb Hews* 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY. 



GEO. L. HACKNEY ". .Editor 

Eev. B. ATKINS, D.D. ( . . . „,. t 

Kev. T. F. MARK, I" Associate Editors 

Miss M. BESSIE ALLEN. Editor Jr. Dept. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year, in advance 50 cts 

Six Months, in advance 35" 

Three Months, in advance 15 " 

Send subscriptions and address all communi- 
cations to the Publisher, — " 

GEO. T.. HACKNEY, 

Asheville, N. C. 

This Page is Edited by Dr. Atkins. 



!• EDITORIAL. 1 



A good test of the sincerity of a Chris- 
tian worker is whether he Will work up 
to uis best in obscuritj'. 
• 
One may be very active and zealous in 
the church when the bottom motive is to 
have the praise of men. 
• 
The Evangelical Lutheran missionary 
society of Leipzig reports an increase in 
India for the pasf year of 1,000 souls. 

e 

The Outlook has discovered that Protest- 
ants in the United States are increasing 
faster than Roman Catholics, and orthodox 
Christians than Unitarians. 

• 
The Japan Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church reported 3,524 full mem- 
bers, 1,189 probationers, 600 baptisms, 8,055 
Sunday school scholars, $3,096 paid pastors, 
$2,000 current expenses. This is only one 
branch of the church operating in Japan. 
What must it all be? 

• 
At the last session of the Tennessee con- 
ference a committee was appointed to take 
steps to inaugurate a conference 'organ. Af- 
ter a number of meetings this committee 
called into conference with them Rev. R. 
N. Price, editor of the Holston Methodist 
and D. W. Patton, publisher, and adopted 
the Holston Methodist as their conference 
organ. This arrangement will hold until 
the sessions of the two conferences, and 
will then probably 'become permanent. Of 
course the name will be changed and pos- 
sibly the place of publication. This will 
give a better field for the paper and ought 
to improve it. 



An Apology to Dr. Kilgo. 

Sometime ago we said that Dr. Kilgo's 
address on Christian education rightly con- 
strued is not antagonistic to state schools. 
The Christian Advocate and Concord Times, 
bath friendly to Dr. Kilgo. had expressed 
the same sentiment. We thought we were 
saying a good word for Dr. Kilgo. But the 



last Christian Educator, Dr. Kilgo's organ, 
says we were trying to belittle and emas- 
culate Dr. Kilgo's address, taking all the 
point out of it, etc. If in saying that Dr. 
Kilgo is not fighting state schools, we have 
offended him we beg Ms pardon and prom- 
ise not to repeat the offense. We are with 
him in his strong advocacy of Christian 
education and In his fight against evils in 
education, but we oann'dt S'tand by him in 
a fight against state schools, Including the 
public schools, graded schools, the Normal 
and Industrial, the A. & M. College, the 
University, the school for the blind and for 
the deaf, and 'the Orphan asylum. The 
work these are doing is too much like Chris 
tian work for a Christian to fight. 

We are surprised that the organ of a 
Christian college should take the lead in 
urging the unconstitutionality of religion In 
state schools. If some infidel had taken 
this position we should not have been sur- 
prised. The articles cited from the con- 
stitution do not prove the premise, besides 
constitutions are in letter and in spirit 
and are subject to change and many aman 
made constitution has crumbled before the 
coming kingdom. We believe in Christian 
education, church colleges and Christian 
influence in all education, and think the 
church schools ought to set a good example 
and help others up to the same high level. 



Thoughts on Education. 

If education is character building it is 
well nigh done when a boy enters the 
higher colleges. Very few should enter before 
sixteen. By that time if the church and 
the home have fulfilled their mission the 
character is formed, the foundation is all 
laid and the habit of life fixed. Henceforth 
the truly educated becomes a positive force 
rather than a passive 'subject. 

If a school or college under state control 
is essentially non-Christian it is because 
it is supported in part by everybody's mon- 
ey and conducted for everybody's benefit. 
If for this reason it is non-Christian, then 
every public school is essentially so, for 
they are supported wholly by everybody's 
money, and if they tend to restore pagan- 
ism we should espouse the contention of 
the Roman Catholics and declare a crusade 
against the whole business. 

Education in the sense of character 
building is much more the work of the 
church and of the home than of the schoil, 
a very small part of it belongs to the 
school. But Christian civilization should 
demand that the school not only shall not 
hinder but also shall contribute to the 
church and home training. 

The true grounds for education by the 
church is not that the church is the only 
body that can do it safely, but that there 
is so much demand for it that every avail- 
able force shall be enlisted. It is the dutv 
of the church to leave the whole of.it with 
the pure and exalted principles and life of 
Christ, 

One of the wildest heresies in education 
is the doctrine we sometimes hear that 
higher education is a luxury. The church 
is really undertaking no other kind. Are 



we making all this ado and straining ev- 
ery nerve just to furnish a luxury to a 
few? High education is as much a ne- 
cessity as low, and we are weak at many 
points for lack of the highest, to get which 
we must needs go to other lands. 

Christianity is too much divided to un- 
dertake universal education. If we were 
all one, or if all could federate and unite 
on this work there would be some hope of 
success. If all the sects or denominations 
should follow the example of the Catholics 
and strive for parish schools wherever 
there is a church there Would be division, 
rivalry, contention, weakness, and, often, 
failure. 

The good citizens should insist that par- 
tisan politics have no place in the man- 
agement of public schools and colleges un- 
der state control. 

If the church will hold otgether every de- 
nomination can have a college in every 
state, and the field of the preparatory or 
high school is open to all, and greatly 
needs to be cultivated. 

The church should establish most of its 
schools for the benefit of the poor. "The 
poor have the gospel preached unto them." 

Some very well educated persons were 
never in college at all. Some with igno- 
rance of the elements of learning have 
succeeded in life, but that is no argument 
against college training. Every one should 
if possible take a full course at college, 
the fuller the better. 

There is a sense in which education is 
an equipment for life, rather than charac- 
ter building. 

Mental training is a realm altogether 
distinct from morals and religion. Igno- 
rance is not sin, neither is mental train- 
ing righteousness. Some very vicious men 
are highly educated. 



The Weakness of Words. 

Can you begin to pray ? That will do. 
Can you commit to memory some other 
man's little prayer and make it your 
own by spiritual appropriation ? That 
will do. There are sundry little prayers 
iu the Bible put there to be adopted. 
Men adopt a little child, men adopt 
foundlings; here are prayers that ate 
meant to be adopted in your heart's 
family: "God be merciful unto me a 
sinner!" It would be a poor memory 
that could not retain that little prayer. 
Yet it is only little in words; in mean- 
ing it is large as sin and vast as mercy 
divine. Can you recite one half of it ? 
Can you get as far as " God be merci- 
ful ?"' If there you are stopped by a sob 
of the heart, God knows the rest. It is 
an utterance of His own inspiration; He 
gave it, He answered it; He gives it 
always, He always answers it. Add 
nothing to that perfectness. There is an 
integrity which we cannot increase; 
there are flowers we ought not to paint. 
Your prayer, therefore, is not little or 
poor because it is not uttered in words, 
or because words will not come fluently, 
or because words only put your heart to 
deeper shame. The prayer is in the 
purpose, not in the utterance.— Joseph 
Parker, D. D. 



THE EPWORTH N £ W S 



Three P's. 



BY R. WILLIAM COWAN. 



Ho, boys ! I'd like to say to you, 

As if I were your father, 
With earnest mind and good intent, 

A word — or three words rather. 

Pluck, Purpose, Perseverance they; 

I call them simply glorious, 
For they who have and use them well 

Shall surely be victorious. 

Purpose sees something to be done 
For our own good or neighbor's; 

Pluck dares to do it, and in faith 
For the great object labors. 

But Pluck and Purpose both are vain, 

As teaches many a story; 
'Tis Perseverance wins the day, 

And leads the boys to glory. 

— Golden Davs. 



rs irtnrinririririrsvTnririnnrinrirttTQ 
| COnnUNICATIONS. 3 

The League as a Factor in flissions.* 

"These are Heaven's men-at-arms 

In van or rear; informed or ignorant 

Ot whither battle rolls, and what shall 

prove 
Its issue; and for-them, whether high spoils 
Of victory at last — the Leader's eye 
'Ware of their wounds — or some forgotten 

grave, 
Where they thiat gained Him glory sleep 

unarmed : 
Always to orders loyal, standing fast 
In what post be assigned; in life and death 
R'ight-m'inded; — loving God 
With lowly heart; and earnest, striving 

soul 
Which trusted, seeing darkly; loving man 
For brotherhood and God that lives in 

man." 
0, brave young soldier of the cross, en- 
listed under the banner of One who has 
never known defeat, what are these orders 
of your Captain? Your presence in the 
camp is a pledge of loyalty. Would it not 
be well if we should recall the stipulation 
of our commission. We. the veterans of 
a hundred battles with our wily foe, and 
you with the flush of youth upon your faces 
just starting to the war; your dauntless 
courage and high, beautiful faith thrilling 
our older hearts with an ecstacy of hope? 
From thousands of throats as with one 
voice, we hear: "Go, ye, and teach all na- 
tions, and lo, I am with you" — how long? 
— "Even to the end." Thus we see that 
for a Christian there is no divorce from the 
spirit of missions. But one may ask, 
"And must we cross the seas to take the 
gospel into heathen lands? Is this what 
is conveyed in the term missions?" The 
answer to the first que ry must be yes, if 

*A paper read by Mrs. N. B, McDowell, of 

Weaveiville, N. C, before the Asheville Dis- 
trict Epworth League Conference. 



In that way the spirit leads: but this is not 
the only condition of the plan. There is 
work at home: "The Greek is at your 
door." 

In "Important Information for Southern 
Methodists." issued by our publishers at 
Nashville, we learn this: "There are 
more than 2,000,000 foreigners on our shores 
from those lands in which we have mis- 
sions." They have come to us; and born 
upon our soil are other millions who need 
your ministrations; not the poor a'.one, but 
all who are perishing of heart — hunger — 
beggar or banker, prince .or pauper, in 
vesture of rags, or clo'thed in "purple and 
fine linen," daintily fed or subsisting on 
husks — wherever there is discontent or 
gloom, reflect from your hearts, made lu- 
minous by the holy light of the Sun of 
Righteousness that radiance that dispels 
shadows and brings peace to the 
"Hearts of men upon earth. 
That rested not from their birth, 
To rest as the wild waters rest 
With colors of Heaven on their breast." 

Learn the deep truth of a recent Sun- 
day school lesson, that more than elo- 
quence, beneficence or martyrdom is love. 
Know for yourselves that "He that loveth 
his brother abideth in the light": 
"For life, with all it yields of joy and woe, 
And hope and fear, 
Is just our chance o' the prize of learning 

love, 
How love might be, hath been indeed, and 

is — 
The love that tops the might, the Christ 
in God." 

I would make this practical. I would 
help you if in my ■power; if known to me, 
to understand your relations to others, 
how far you are, in truth, your "brother's 
keeper." 

Can you receive a help where- 
by you grow into the stature of 
a child of God 'and withhold, un- 
condemned, that help from one of God's 
creatures in need? Everyone is in need 
who has not drunk of the water of life 
and felt within him the kingdom of heav- 
en, which is "righteousness and peace and 
joy in the Holy Ghost." Read Ezekiel's 
warning, it may quicken the conscience: 
"When I say unto the wicked, 0, wicked 
man, thou shalt surely die, if thou dost not 
speak to warn the wicked from his way, 
that wicked man shall die in his iniquity; 
but his blood will I require at thine 
hand." 

Do you not recommend to others looks 
that you have read and enjoyed, schools 
you have honored with your patronage, 
merchandise whose excellence you have 
tested? Does shyness prevent your speak- 
ing to your companions of the "Book of 
Life," the Teacher who "spake as never 
man spake," and the "pearl of groat 
price?" I know the silent influence of 
consistent living cannot be overestimated, 
but there is a force perhaps unknown else 
where in the gracious music of a human 
voice, conveying a tender solicitude tor 
our redemption from evil, and an earnest, 
loving look of kindly interest and sympa- 
thy is often worth more than gold. 



I would not have you think that your 
mission work must be all sentiment; the 
divison under which my topic is found 
is significantly styled, "Mercy and Help," 
implying work for both heart and hand, 
but I would emphasize the personal ele- 
ment in all your efforts, for I beliove with 
Lowell that and those we aid are njcs't 
benefitted by 

"Not what we give, but what we share, — 
For the gift without the giver is bai J." 

In the Western North Carolina cjnfe*'- 
ence, you, as Leaguers, have a special ob- 
ject for your benevolences, being pledged to 
the support of the Brevard school; and 
the defininteness of this cause will expand 
your hearts, intensify your zeal, enlarge 
your conceptions and give you a liberality 
of thought that does not always attend a 
diffuse or unrestricted interest. No plea of 
poverty should interfere with this privi- 
lege we have of aiding our friends and 
neighbors. 

The problem of ways and means is of'en 
so intricate that I Kail with joy any equa- 
tion that promises a solution to the diffi- 
culty, hence. I was delighted not long 
since to hear in a discussion by some min- 
isterial brethren this perplexing mission- 
ary question most satisfactorily answered. 
In this paper I can give you but a meagre 
suggestion of the valuable information I 
received. This is the idea: A piece cf 
property is devoted to missionary purposes, 
is conscientiously employed, and as con- 
scientiously applied, the revenue, however 
great, is God's; we are stewards. Th : plan 
is not new, but the presentation invested 
it with the charm of novelty. My reason 
was convinced by the plain argumentative 
statements made by Dr. Reagan; and the 
cumulative financial force of a humble 
barn-yard fowl as set forth by Dr. Janus 
Atkins would have enraptured the soul of 
Napier. My heart was converted to tnc 
plan by these two practical logicians who 
so completely hold my confidence, and I 
am going to show my faith by my wQrks. 

If I could say something that would stir 
my young friends and my older friends to 
greater activity on this subject. I would 
be devoutly grateful. Your enthusiasm, if 
aroused, would invigorate mine. Shall we 
not, for love of God in Christ, who gave 
his life for us, and then try with greater 
dilligence to send the Light to those of 
our Father's family that in foreign lands 
sit in heathen darkness and to those in 
our own land that are enveloped in the 
"double night of darkness and silence," 
who, "having eyes, see not and having cars 
hear not," in the midst of the resplendent 
beauty and the melting harmony of God's 
love in this Christian land? 

Service to one another is a privilege; it 
is no less an imperative duty 

I shall let Arnold close, as he began this 
paper: 

"The gateway of His kingdom He did shut 
On them who named His name, but let 

the sick 
Lie helpless, and the naked go unclad; 
The Fatherless uncared for; prisoners 
Unvisited; the woe-begone of earth 
I'nsuecored; — vainly dreaming to love God 
Who did not love their brothers." 



T II E E P W R T II N E W S 



Macon County S. S. and Epworth 
League Conference. 

We have just closed our county S. S. and 
E. L. Conference, which was held at As- 
bury church on the Highlands circuit, on 
August 27-29, and which proved to be a 
decided success. 

The conference was presided over by Bro. 
T. R. Gray of the Macon circuit, with much 
ease and in a true business style. 

After religious services conducted by 
Rev. J. H. Bradley, the roll was called, and 
a majority of the delegates and members 
answered to their names. Reports from 
the several Sunday schools were taken up, 
and some quite interesting talks were 
made by both minister and laymen. 

About all the business part of the first 
day was consumed in hearing and discuss- 
ing the reports of the different Sunday 
schools. Our Sunday schools are growing 
in interest and number and scholars. We 
have 17 schools in Macon county, with 
about 850 members. We have already seen 
a great advancement since last year, and it 
has been given in, that the cause has been 
due to the conference that was held in the 
county last year. So you can see that we 
as a. Methodist people cannot afford not to 
hold a conference every year. 

The second day the reports from the Ep- 
worth Leagues were taken up, and the 
different questions on the programme 
were enthusiastically discussed by Revs. 
J. H. Bradley. J. W. Byrd, R. 
B. Shelton, and George J. Owen 
and others. Then the conference was 
well addressed by Bro. Reynolds, a 
layman of the Franklin circuit. We on'y 
have five Epworth Leagues in Macon coun- 
ty at present; but we as the preachers of 
this county mean to have quite a number 
more to add to our list before the close of 
the year. 

We were somewhat disappointed by the 
absence of Rev. D. F. Carver of the Frank- 
lin station, who was expected to be on 
hand with an interesing address on the 
"Home Department" of the Sunday school 
w r ork. 

Iotla church in the Franklin circuit was 
elected as the place of next year's confer- 
ence. We trust we shall all be blessed to 
meet again together and enjoy relating to 
each other our field of labor. God bless all 
the church's institutions for good! 

GEO. J. OWEN. 



\ THE JUNIOR DEPARTMENT. 



Edited by MISS M. BESSIE ALLEN, 
Hendersonvh.le, N. C. 



" So he praised my singing, did he ?" 
" Yes; he said it was heavenly." 
" Did he really say that ?" 
" Well, not exactly; but he probably 
meant that. He said it was unearthly." 
— Collier's Weekly. 

A clergyman in an Eastern town 
warned his hearers lately " not to walk 
in a slippery path, lest they be sucked 
maelstrom like, into its meshes." This 
metaphor suggests that of another cler- 
gyman, who prayed that the " Word 
might be as a nail driven in a sure place, 
sending its roots downward and its 
branches upward." 



Salutatory. 

Dear Friends: — As you all doubtless 
know, I was appointed Secretary of Junior 
Work, at the recent District Epworth 
League conference which met at West 
Chapel. I accepted the appointment with 
fear and trembling, and now that it comes 
to the actual work of managing a depart- 
ment in the Epworth News and writing a 
"Salutatory," as Brother Hackney says, I 
am in still greater fear and trembling. 

But for all that, I am heart and soul in 
the work, for I sincerely believe the Junior 
work presents the richest and broadest field 
for cultivation in all our beloved Method- 
ism, outside of the ministry. And so when 
I heard the Master's voice, as it spoke to 
me through the conference, saying daugh- 
ter, here is work to do, I accepted the com- 
mission and am here to do his bidding, 
while I look to him for guidance and wis- 
dom, and trust him for success. 

The first thing we want to do is to hear 
from all the organized Juniors in the dis- 
trict, so that we may keep in touch with 
each other, and by close contact assist and 
stimulate each other to more earnest work 
and greater endeavor. Wont you, dear 
Juniors, write me at once, telling me all 
about your societies? When organ. zed? 
How many enrolled members? How many 
regularly attend your meetings? Who 
leads your devotional meetings? etc., etc. 

The next thing is to enlist the members 
of the Senior Leagues in organizing Jun- 
ior societies. I am sure you will find your 
pastors in sympathy with this work, and 
that you will find them efficient helpers if 
you will undertake it. Many of our Senior 
Leagues are anxiously asking what they 
can do besides hold their regular devotional 
meetings. To all such I bring this reply, 
organize a Junior society, if you can get as 
many as six boys and girls with whiich to 
organize. Just think a moment, if you can 
train six children to be efficient earnest 
workers fgr our blessed Lord, you will have 
accomplished a work that angels could 
envy, and if you should not be able to do 
anything else all your life, your crown 
would be decked with stars that would be 
countless. 

I am not dear friends an "organizer," but 
it is only my duty to stimulate and en- 
courage societies already organized, and by 
persistent effort to try to awaken and 
arouse an interest in this great work. Let 
us open our eyes and behold the wonderful 
possibilities of this work. It is our priv- 
ilege to train the little ones just as we 
train the vines that twine around our doors 
but we must begin when they are young 
and tender, or we can never succeed in 
making them symmetrical and beautiful. 

The wicked one is ever on the alert to 
ensnare and lead our children into evil. He 



does not wait till they are sixteen to enlist 
their interests and effections, but early 
presents his allurements to their young 
minds and when he finds them with noth- 
ing better in their hearts and minds he has 
no trouble in getting a hold, that takes 
often-times prayers and tears and work 
and worry to overcome. How shall the 
children of darkness be wiser than the 
Children of light? Let us give our children 
something good to do and we will not so 
often find them straying into forbidden 
paths; let us store their minds with good 
thoughts and high aspirations and there 
will not be so much room for evil. I would 
be glad to have any Christian that will 
undertake to organize a Junior society in 
their community write me, or if they can- 
not organize, they could be instrumental in 
doing good if they would send me the ad- 
dress of a suitable person that might be 
induced to undertake tihe work, so that I 
could write them and send literature for 
organization. There is great opportunity 
here for those who want to' serve a loving 
Father and be a 'blessing to their church 
and pastor. Try it Christian and see if the 
Lord does not bless you. 
"If among the older people, 
You may not be apt to teach, 
'Feed my lambs,' said Christ, our shepherd. 
•Place the food within their reach.' 
And it may be that the children 
You have led with trembling hand. 
Will be found among your jewels. 
When you reach the better land. 

Let none hear you idly saying, 
'There is nothing I can do.' 
Take the task he gives you gladly. 
Let his work your pleasure be; 
Answer quickly when he calleth, 
Here am I use me, use me. 

All for Christ, 

M. BESSIE ALLEN. 



A Remarkable Dog. 

Those who have listened to a com- 
pany of hunters and fishermen while 
they recited their expefiences, will ap- 
preciate this one : 

Two senators were telling tall stories 
about their dogs. The dog tales grew 
longer and longer. At last a Southern 
member of the House broke in : 

" You think those things are marvel- 
ous, do you? I can tell you something 
about a pointer that beats them. Sev- 
eral of us were out gunning. Suddenly 
in the midst of a lonely country road, 
my pointer stood stock still. There was 
no evidence of game. There was no 
one on the road but an old country far- 
mer, standing stock still too, gazing at 
us. A moment later we found that the 
farmer's name was Partridge." 



T H E E P W R T H N E AY S 



£be £pwortb 1Rews* 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY. 



(iEO. t. HACKNEY Editor 

Itev. I>. ATKINS, D.D. I . . . _, ... 

Kev. T. F. MAISR, I Associate Editors 

MissM. BESSIE ALLEN' Editor Jr. Dept. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year, in advance 50 cts 

Six Months, in advance ..35 " 

Three Months, in advance 15 " 

Send subscriptions and address all communi- 
cations to the Publisher, 

(iEO. I.. HACKNEY, 

Asheville. N. C. 

Asheville, N.C., September 15, 1897. 



Weaverville College opened better 
than the faculty expected. 



We understand that Trinity College 
will open well. Dr. Kilgo expects at 
least 175 pupils. 



President Peacock, of Greensboro Fe- 
male College, reports the largest enroll- 
ment of pupils for the first week since 
the war. 



Mr. J. C. Horner, of the Horner Mili- 
tary School at Oxford, writes: "The 
school has opened better than we ex- 
pected. A larger number of new stu- 
dents than for several years." 



Rev. S. B. Turrentine delivered a lec- 
ture before the Epworth League of Sal- 
isbury last Friday night, which from be- 
ginning to end was of a very high order. 
Bro. Turrentine is a first-class speaker. 



A protracted meeting is in progress at 
Central church, this city. Rev. J. W. 
Jones, of the Morganton District, and 
the city preachers are assisting Dr. Byrd. 
The indications are that a much needed 
revival will be the result. 



The Holy Sabbath. 

It is believed by many that in Asheville 
and other places Sabbath desperation is on 
the increase. Sabbath exhibitions alt the 
park are frequent and shameful. Among 
other things a balloon ascension has been 
witnessed by thousands more than once. 
We do not know who is responsible for 
■these things, but we do know that what- 
ever the motive it is a disgrace to the dity 
and ought to be stopped. Many shops also 
are kept open. It is time for the pulpits 
and the press to speak out in clear tones. 
The Methodist preachers meeting here has 
had the matter before them and the breth- 
ren have resolved to declare themselves. 
Let the work of reform go on. Give us a 
quiet, religious Sabbath, and let not our 
splendid southern civilization be drawn 
into the whirlpool and the cesspool of Eu- 
ropean Sabbath desecration and European 
morals. 



The Table of the Lord. 

The Lord's Supper comes directly to us 
from the "uppeT room." If it was not in- 
stituted there and then history fails to ac- 
count for its origin. If there were no 
Christ how come this feast? It is there- 
fore a tangible link binding us to the liv- 
ing Christ. 

It is expressive of faith in the atonement 
by death. By it we "show forth the Lord's 
death till he come." So long then as we 
eat the bread and drink the wine we dis- 
card the heresy of redemption alone 
through life, without death. 

It is far more a communion with the 
Lord than a comm union with one another. 
One person may take it effectively, yet it 
does express brotherly love. 

It is a restoration of our profession of 
faith, and helps us to get very near to 
Jesus in our thoughts and feelings. 

There is no mystic virtue in it, confer- 
ring upon the comers thereto special grace 
and power, as though we did realy eat the 
flesh literally and drink the Mood. It is 
a duty as well as a privilege, and no one 
oan absent himself without sin. This is a 
view not universally held, but there can 
be no doubt as to its truth. Some do re- 
frain. At some places very few of the 
young members Of the church come to the 
communion. One reason of this is that 
there are pastors who do not explain it, and 
do not administer it. In some country 
charges it is never seen except at quarterly 
meetings. This is a grave fault of a pas- 
tor. 

It should be held in every church at least 
twice a year and all the people made to un- 
derstand it thoroughly. Another cause is 
that in some places there are only a few 
Christian young people and it is a little 
embarrassing to single oneself out. But 
this is part of religion, and no one can fol- 
low Christ who is not willing to bear such 
a cross. 

Some misconceive, and fear that they 
will drink to themselves damnation. That 
should be impossible in the present manner 
of administering. Such could be only 

when they drink to drunkenness and eat 
to gluttony. As you prize your salvation, 
and seek the higher consecration always 
use this means of grace when you have op- 
portunity. 



Notes from Lexington. 

Dear Mr. Hackney: At the sugges- 
tion of our pastor, Bro. Parker, I write 
you a few lines in regard to our League 
in Lexington. 

I feel that we are improving and gain- 
ing strength, though our devotioual 
meetings are not attended as well as 
they might and ought to be. 

The interest seems to centre in the lit- 
erary meetings and as I am 3d vice pres- 
ident, I try to make these meetings as 
entertaining and profitable as possible. 

I thank you for the bundle of papers 
received some time ago. 

I have found great difficulty in getting 



members to take the league literature, 
but hope to be able to send you some 
subscribers for the News before long. 

Our members are anxious to get a li- 
brary started. We had an entertain- 
ment a few weeks ago, from which we 
realized about $iS, after expenses were 
paid, and this we expect to devote to 
that purpose. 

Pray for us, please, that we may in- 
crease in strength and usefulness. 

With best wishes for the News and its 
editors, I am sincerely, 

[Miss] Maggie Robbins. 



New Books. 

Jerome; a Poor Man, by Mary E. 
Wilkins, illustrated by A. I. 
Keller: New York, Harper 
& Brothers. $1.50. 

This is a story of New England life, 
and is told in a realistic and enjoyable 
manner. It has been said that all of 
Miss Wilkins' previous works have 
lacked an indefinable something, but in 
Terome we have, with all the merits of 
Miss Wilkins' earlier work, the indefin- 
able something added. 

Jerome is a strong character. He is 
sensitive, self-reliant, ambitious, and, 
perhaps, too proud. Lucina, whom he 
eventually marries, is a lovable charac- 
ter. Eben Merritt, Lucina's father, is a 
genial, wholesouled, kind of man, while 
another of the chief characters, Simon 
Bassett, is one of the meanest and most 
profane and miserly men ofre cares to 
meet. 

We predict a large sale for this book. 
It it well-written and cannot fail to 
please the novel reading public. 

Robert, the Bruce, by Sir Herbert 
Maxwell: G. P. Putnam's 

Sons, New York. 

Sir Herbert Maxwell is the author of a 
new volume in the "Heroes of the Na- 
tions" series. Sir Herbert's subject is 
"Robert the Bruce and the Struggle for 
Scottish Independence," and his is a 
book worth reading. He has taken great 
care to avoid the assertion of circum- 
stances which there is no means of veri- 
fying; for example, the well-worn myth 
of Bruce and the spider. It is as a his- 
tor}', however, rather than as a biogra- 
phy, that the volume has value. — The 
Outlook. 

Trif and Trixy, by John Habber- 
ton : Philadelphia, Henry Al- 
tenius. 

Mr. Habberton's latest book does not 
reach the standard of his "Helen's Ba- 
bies." 

The story in "Trif and Trixy" is 
made up simply of the love affairs of two 



THE EP WORTH NEW 



S 



young couples, which Trii, a young 
matron, tries to promote, and is sadly 
interfered with by the innocent prattle 
of Trixy, her child. Trixy seems unus- 
ually quick to hear and comprehend 
everything said around her, and by rep- 
etitions of same to the wrong people, 
causes many misunderstandings. The 
young lovers all come happily together 
in the end, however, and it is quite pro- 
bable that Trixy did as much towards 
bringing about this happy climax as she 
did towards making trouble in the be- 
ginning. 

The book is not particularly well writ- 
ten. It lacks originality- and force; but 
it ma}- prove attractive to the young. 

Soldiers of Fortune, by Richard 
Harding Davis. 12 mo. $1.50. 
illustrated by C. W. Gibson : 
New York, Charles Scribner's 

Sons. 

"Soldiers of Fortune," Mr. Davis' last 
and most complete novel, is attracting 
considerable notice, and promises to be 
one of the most lasting books of the day. 
The scene is laid in a South American 
Republic, in a mining district. A New 
York capitalist, his two daughters, the 
President, his beautiful wife, an English 
soldier of fortune, and a voung mining 
engineer, the hero of the book, are 
among the principal characters. A rev- 
olution takes place in Olancho, and is 
quelled through the management of the 
young hero, the president being too 
weak a man to manage the government. 

The fighting and plotting, added to the 
romantic love affair between the young 
miner and the capitalist's brave daugh- 
• ter, render the story quite brisk and ex- 
citing. Without being sensational, the 
book keeps one's interest at a high 
point from first to last. 



Literary Notes. 

Mrs. Stevenson, the devoted mother of 
the novelist, died recently. 

Another edition of Boswell's "Life of 
Johnson" is about to be issued under the 
editorship of Percy Fitzgerald. 

"The Choir Invisible," published just 
two months ago. is already in its fifth edi- 
tion. -This completes the twenty-fourth 
thousand. 

The Macmillan company have in prepa- 
ration a Dictionary of Architecture, to be 
published in three large octavo volumes, 
under the direction of Russell Sturgis. 

Ian Maclaren's new religious work, to be 
published in the autumn by Messrs. Dodd, 
Mead and company, will be entitled The 
Potter's Wheel. 

Mrs. F. A. Steel's next book will be a 
fresh collection of Indian stories, and will 
be published by Mr. Heinemann in Eng- 



land, and in this country by the Macmil- 
lan company. 

Mr. G-eorge Gissing's new novel, entitled 
The Whirlpool, which has been much talk- 
ed about during the last few months in 
London, will 'be published in this country 
in the autumn by the Frederick A. Stokes 
company. 

We hear that the J. B. Lippincott com- 
pany have secured the American book- 
rights of Dr. Conan Doyle's new stoiy ntow 
running serially in the Strand Magazine, 
entitled The Tragedy of the Korosko. 

The Macmillan company is about to pub- 
lish a new Handbook of European History', 
by Arthur Hassall, General Editor of the 
Periods of European History Series. It is 
gotten up somewhat after the plan of Nich- 
ols' Historical Tables or the Chronolo- 
gical Outlines of Literature by Ryland and 
Whitcomb. 

The additional and uniform volume of 
the "Modern Readers' Bible Series," under 
the title Select Masterpieces of Biblical 
Literature, will not be a book of extracts; 
it- will contain only complete and inde- 
pendent literary compositions or integral 
and separable parts of the longer composi- 
tions, arranged in the form in which they 
have appeared in the various volumes of 
the Modern Readers' Bible. 

We hear that a new book about Carlyle 
will be published shortly in England, en- 
titled Mr. Froude and Thomas Carlyle. It 
will deal with Fronde's misrepresentations, 
and the title is said to be intentionally sar- 
castic. The author, Mr. David Wilson, 
holds a government position in Burmali, 
and this work is the outcome of a long 
study of the subject which he has pursued 
in the enforced solitude of his duties. — 
The Bookman. 



If you need a 



A Dollar's Worth of Sense. 

The Examiner says that once when 
Chief Justice John Marshall was driv 
ing, the hub of his wheel caught on a 
small sapling growing by the roadside. 
After striving unsuccessfully for some 
moments to extricate the wheel, he 
heard the sound of an ax in the woods 
and saw a negro approaching. Hailing 
him, he said : " If you will get that ax 
and cut down this tree, I'll give you a 
dollar." " I kin git yo' by 'thout de 
ax, ef dat's all yo' want." "Yes, that's 
all," said the judge. The man simply 
backed the horse until the wheel was 
clear of the sapling, and then brought 
the vehicle safely around it. "You 
don't charge a dollar for that, do you?" 
asked the astonished chief justice. "No, 
massa, but its wuth a dollar to larn 
some folks sense." The quick-witted 
darkey got the dollar without further 
questioning. 




we can suit you. 



If your Epworth League, Sunday- 
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either a 



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it will be to your interest to write us 
^Ve sell for cash or on installment. 



Houg'h & Dunham, 

11 Church St;, Asheville, N. C. 



School Shoes 



will soon lie needed. In 
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Never silence your gun in ihe face of 
any evil, but remember it is belter to 
save than kill. — Bishop Galloway. 



SPANGENBERG'S 



4 North Court Square. 



8 



T H E E P W R T H N E W S 



f grvotional gUftiug. $ 

TOPICS FOR SEPTEHBER. 



The Christ of St. Paul. 



sep , , — His Character and Teachings. 

II Cor. x, 1: Rom. i, 16; xii, 9-21. 

Todtay's lesson is divided for us into two 
general heads: I. Christ's character. II. 
Christ's teachings. Thes- to.vever may bi 
sub-divided: 

In our first reference. II Cor. xi. St. Paul 
tells us that Christ is meek. That re- 
minds us of one of Christ's own utteran- 
ces in the Sermon on the Mount, Matt, v: 
5, "Blessed are the meek for they shall in- 
herit the earth. Believing strongly in the 
power of the gospel to accomplish that for 
which it was sent, and since Christ must 
reign until he has put all things under 
his feet, we know that those who possess 
the Christ-like quality shall some day lit- 
erally inherit the earth. We are told that 
Moses was a meek man. Mcses was a man 
honored of God. We cannot think that 
God would have chosen a man who was 
not meek and patient to perform the great 
task of leading the children of Israel out 
of Egypt. An arrogant, self-willed, im- 
pulsive or impatient man could never have 
done the work. Moses at one time showed 
his impatience and was severely punished 
therefor. 

How beautifully meek Christ was. He 
was misjudged, misunderstood, mal-treat- 
ed, persecuted, spit upon, beaten, crucified, 
yet no resentful passion ever arose in his 
divine breast. Christ would have his fol- 
lowers show the same spirit. We all 
know that it is exceedingly hard not to re- 
vile when reviled. But Christ tells us, 
"Blessed are ye when men shall revile you 
and persecute you and shall say all man- 
ner of evil against you. falsely, for my 
sake." Lord, help us to return good for 
evil. 

We are told 2nd that Christ was gentle. 
How much that one word gentle expresses. 
Men are repelled by roughness, but drawn 
irresistably by gentleness. Christ was ca- 
pable of the greatest endurance, yet he was 
as gentle as a woman. No one could be 
more tender in a sick loom no one could 
comfort the afflicted mourner so well as 
he: no one was more sympathetic; no one 
was gentler when dealing with a penitent 
sinner, yet no one was so severe in con- 
demning the sins of the impenitent. How 
tender he is at the well; in the home of 
Mary and Martha and Lazarus: ho v beiu- 
tifully tender with the sinful but penitent 
Magdalene. He was gentle in the presenc 1 
of his false-accusers and unjust judg^. "He 
was brought as a lamb to the slaughter, 
and as a sheep before her shearers is 
dumb, so he openeth not his mouth." 

We must Hot understand that a lack of 
sprightliness of spirit is meekness. A m'an 
may lack this and not be meek, whi'e. on 
the other hand, he may be meek, and at 
the same time possess a great deal of 
spiiir. For instance, Mite-, was m'fk yet 
he condemned sin and punished it in his 
people. Christ was meek, yet he poured 
out the most scathing invectives upnn thp 
unbelieving Jews. Lest we consume too 
much space on his character, we mils stop 
here and take up, 

II. His teachings. 1. They were simple. 
While "advancing doctrines so far trans- 
cending all systems of philosophy, and op- 
ening mysteries that defy all human pow- 
ers of explanation," he does it in so s;mpl ■ 
a way that "they who run may read." 



What could be simpler than the parables? 
What can be more forceful than the sim- 
ple utterances, ye must be born again, I 
am the way, the truth and the light, the 
wages of sin is death, and scores of others 
of like nature? In all he speaks directly 
to men's convictions, utterly disregarding 
all elaborations which the unlettered cou'.d 
not grasp. "To 'be capable of his doctrine 
only requires that the hearer be a human 
creature wanting to know the truth." 

2. They were convincing. No man could 
honestly listen to him without being con- 
vinced. 3. They were convicting. Men 
fell at his feet convicted Of gin. Zaeeheus 
was both convinced and convicted in the 
presence of Jesus, and began to make con- 
fession and promises of restitution. 4. 
They were accompanied with power. Men 
quailed and quaked when listening to his 
truths, either uttered by himself or by his 
disciples. Felix trembled while Paul reas- 
oned of righteousness, temperance and 
judgment to come. The rich young ruler, 
feeling the power of the gospel, went away 
sorrowful. The very devils themselves 
trembled in his presence. 

In Christ's teachings we find tb.it perfect 
system which others had yearned for and 
felt after, but found not. But. unless we 
base our lives upon the principles of the 
gospel of Christ, it availeth us nothing, 
but, on the other hand, will be a testimony 
against us at the latter day. 

Bushnell's "Character of Jesus." a little 
book of less than a hundred pages, will 
help us in the study of this lesson. 



Sept. 



26— His Betrayal, Crucifixion 
and Resurrection. 



I Cor. xi. 23: i. 3-23; ii. 2-28; Gal. ii, 20; iii, 1. 

Again we have our lesson divided for 
us into three parts: I. Christ's Betrayal. 
II. His Crucifixion. III. His Resurrection. 

In ihis Paul is not recounting the scenes 
of the great tragedy from exactly the same 
standpoint as the apoitles. He was among 
the unbelieving, who were consenting to, 
if not actually assisting, in his crucifixion. 
He was one who gladly would have wiped 
Christ's record from the pages of h's'ory, 
who would have assisted in spreading the 
report that his followers stole him from 
the tomb. But after his conversioi we find 
him accepting the true account and through 
all his writings he magnifies the risen 
Christ. 

What must Paul have thought of Ch'ist's 
betrayal and of his betrayer. He who him- 
self w r as honest, who moved with his whole 
soul into whatever work he was engaged. 
w r ho was open in all he did, must have 
loathed the coward that, in the darkness 
of the night, could betray his friend and 
benefactor. 

Paul was not an associate, nor, so far as 
we have any account, even an acquaintance' 
of Judas, but he knew all about the trans- 
action for the thirty pieces of silver. He 
knew of Judas' perfidy. He knew the part 
the priests played, and all concerning it. 
Hence, we find him speaking of these 
events from an absolute knowledge of the 
facts. 

I wonder if Paul was present a.t the 
trial, if he saw Pilate as he scourged Je- 
sus, if he followed him to Calvary, if he 
saw the nails pierce his hands and feet, if 
re saw his spear-riven side? I wonder if 
he. with Pilate and others, were affrighted 
when I he darkness des ended and the earth 
totteln d on its foundations? If so, was not 
Paul trying to drown his conviction when 
he was zealously persecuting the Chris- 
tians? He sroke from experience of these 
things certainly. He recognized the im- 
I ortance of the atoning death of Christ. 

He was not present at the triumph, at 
the resurrection. No one saw the Son of 
Cod step forth from the tomb. Not even 
ihe stern watchers of Rome saw that, for 
their eye lids became heavy as death for 



the time being. This was the final tri- 
umph of Christ's life upon earth. He had 
destroyed death. Thereafter his timid fol 
lowers became as brave as lions, and boldly 
preached the risen Christ and fearlessly 
suffered death for him. 

Christ's resurrection was a reality to 
Paul. He heard the strange story, but 
persistently closed his ears to it, until 
Christ met him in the way, and the strange 
bright light appeared and the voice — that 
grieved but gentle voice — spake aloud to 
him, "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou 
me?" Recognizing the divine accents, he 
answered, "Lord, what wilt thou have me 
to do?" The dead, the crucified Christ had 
appeared to him in the way and he knew 
him. 

Paul tbears witness that none of the 
princes of the world knew Christ; saying, 
if they had known him, they would not 
have crucified him. 

In this matter. Paul recognizes that 
Christ died for the salvat'on of men, and 
that it was a voluntary death prompted by 
love (Gal. 2:20). He recognizes, too, 
that the true Christian must be crucified 
to the world and live in Christ and that 
Christ must live in him. Paul never 
thinks of Christ as a dead Christ, but as 
living and ever present in the soul of the 
believer. 

We must draw a lesson from Paul's ex- 
perience, and ask a pertinent question to 
bring it out. Am I. are you. my reader, 
crucified, dead unto the world? We all 
want to be. God help us. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

In Effect June 20. 1897. 



NO. 15. 



(Central Time.) 



NO. 16. 



:25 am 
:45 am 
:30 pm 
:35 pm 
:40 pm 
:38 pm 
:45 pm 
:55 pm 
:12 pm 
:15 pm 
:55 pm 
:18 pm 
:40 pm 
:15 pm 
:30 pm 
:46 pm 
02 pm 
:35 pm 
53 pm 
:04 am 
:12 am 
:17 am 
:29 am 
:00 am 
00 am 
05 am 

39 am 

40 am 
35 pm 



Lv Norfolk 

Lv.. Pinners Point . 

Ar Selma 

Lv Selma 

Lv Raleigh ... 

Lv Durham .... 

Ar.. .Greensboro .. 
Lv... Greensboro .. 
Lv.. .High Point .. 
Ar Salisbury (E time) 
Lv Salisbury (C time) 
Lv.... Cleveland ... 
Lv... .Statesville ... 

Lv Newton ... 

Lv Hickory 

Lv Connelly Springs 

Lv Morganton ... 

Lv Marion .... 

Lv Old Fort ... 

Lv Biltmore 



Ar.. 
Ar.. 
Ar.. 
Ar.. 
Ar.. 
Lv.. 
Lv.. 
Ar.. 
Ar.. 



. Asheville . 

. Asheville 
Hot Springs 
Morristown 

. Knoxville . 

. Knoxville . 

. Cleveland . 
Chattanooga 

. Nashville . 



Ar 5 
Ar. 5 
Lv 12 
Ar-12 
Lv 11 
Lv 10 
Lv 8 
Ar 8 
Ar 8 
Lv 7 
Ar 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 

Lv 2 
Lv 1 
Lv 1 
Ar 1 
Lv 12 
LvlO 
Lv 9 
Ar 9 
Lv 7 
Lv 6 
Lv 12 



25 pm 
05 pm 
50 pm 
45 pm 
45 am 
:52 am 

50 am 
25 am 

:20 am 
.in am 
:00 am 
:38 am 
16 am 
:39 am 
■23 am 
:06 am 
:49 am 
15 am 
55 am 

51 am 
44 am 

:39 am 
:23 am 
55 pm 
50 pm 
55 pm 

19 pm 

20 pm 
25 pm 



EASTBOUND. 



No. 6. No, 12. 



Lv Chattanooga 
Lv Knoxville . . . 
Lv Morristown 
Lv Hot Springs. 
Ar Asheville . . . 



. 8:30 am 
.12:05 pm 
. 1 :25 pm 
. 3:15 pm 
. 4:35 pm 



4:05 am 
8:25 am 
9:50 am 
ll:46au> 
1:15 pm 



No. 38. 



Lv Asheville 1:25 pm 

Lv Biltmore 1:36 pm 

Lv Round Knob 2:35 pm 

Lv Marion 3.32pm 

Lv Morganton 4.11pm 

Ar Hickory 4.50pm 

Ar Newton 5.08pm 

Ar Statesville 5.48pm 



Prudent People Purchase Prescriptions at Dr. T. C. Smith's Drug Store on the Public Square. 



T HE E P W O R T II N E W S 



9 



Ar Salisbury 6.40pm 

(Eastern Time.) 

Lv Salisbury 9.36pm 8.15pm 

Lv Greensboro 10.44pm 9.52pm 

Ar Danville 12.00 m 11.25pm 

Ar Lynchburg 1.58am 

Ar Charlottesville 3.35am 

Ar Washington 6.42am 

Ar Baltimore 8.00am 

Ar Philadelphia 10.15am 

Ar New York 12.43pm 

Ar Richmond 6.00am 

Ar Durham 5.30am 

Ar Raleigh 7.10am 

Ar Goldsboro 1.10pm 

WESTBOUND 11 S7 

Lv Goldsboro 4.45pm 

Lv Raleigh 2.00am 

Lv Durham 3.30am 

Lv Richmond 2.00am 

Lv New York 4.30pm 

Lv Philadelphia 6.50pm 

Lv Baltimore 9.20pm 

Lv Washingon 10.43pm 

Lv Charlottesville . . . . 1.55ant 

Lv Lynchburg 3.46am 

Lv Danville 6.05am 6.50am 

Lv Greensboro 7.32am 7.05am 

Ar Salisbury 9.37am 1.17am 

(Central Time.) 

Lv Salisbury 8.65am 

Ar Statesville 9.46am 

Ar Newton 10.26am 

Lv Hickory 10.47am 

Ar Morganton 11.28am 

Ar Marion 12.12pm 

Ar Round Knob 12.60pm 

Ar Biltmore 2,15pm 

Ar Asheville 2.25 pm No. 5. 

Lv Asheville 2.30 pm 6.15 am 

Lv Hot Springs 3.52 pm 7.39 am 

Lv Morristown 5.55 pm 9.30 am 

Ar Knoxville 7.40 pm 11.00 am 

Ar Chattanooga 11.35 pm 7.40 pm 

Ar Nashville 6.45 am S.45 am 

A. & S. ROAD. 10. 14. .8 

Lv Asheville . . . 2.05 pm 7.20 am 8.00 pm 

(Eastern Time.) 

Lv Asheville 3.05 pm 8.20 am 9.00 pm 

Lv Biltmore 3.15 pm 8.28 am 9.10 pm 

Lv Hen'sonv'l .. 4.00 pm 9.18 am 9.58 pm 

Lv Tryon 5.00 pm 10.20 am 11.02 pm 

Lv Spartanburg.. 6.08 pm 11.28 am 12.10 am 

Ar Union 7.15 pm 12.45 pm 

Lv Union 7.30 pm 1.05 pm 

Lv Alston 8.53 pm 2.45 pm 

Ar Columbia 9.38 pm 3.35 pm 

(Central Time.) 

Ar. Savannah 5:00 am. 

Ar. Jacksonville ... 9:10 am. 

9. 13 7 

Lv. Jacksonville . 7:00 pm. 
Lv. Savannah 11:36 pm. 

(Eastern Time.) 
Lv Columbia . . . 8.30 am 11.30 am 

Lv Alston 9.07 am 12.15 am 

Ar Union 10.20 am 1.42 pm 

Lv Union 2.02 pm 

Lv Spartanburg 11.45 pm 3.33 pm 6.45 am 

Lv Tryon 12.42 pm 6.00 pm 7.42 am 

Lv Hend'sonvl .. 1.45 pm 6.05 pm 8.45 am 
Lv Biltmore .... 2.35 pm 6.52pm 9.35am 
Ar Asheville 2.45 pm 7.00 pm 9.45 am 

(Central Time.) 
Ar Asheville 1.45 pm 6.00 pm 8.45 am 

MURPHY BRANCH. 17 Mixed. (7 

Except Sunday. 

Lv. Asheville 4:40 pm. 9:00 am. 

I v. W'aynesville .. 6:05 pm. 11:30 am. 

Ar. Balsam 6:30 pm. 12:16 am. 

Ar. Bryson City .... 8:40 pm. 8:30 pm. 

Ar. Andrewi 6:45 pm. 

Ar. Tuiuoila 7:37 pm. 

Ar. Murphy 8:00 pm. 

18 Mixed. «6 

Lv Murphy 4:30 am. 



Lv. Tomotla 4 : 50 am. 

Ar. Andrews 5:20 am. 

Lv. Bryson City.... 8:40 am. 

Lv. Balsam 8:20 am. 11:30 pm 

Lv. Balsam 10:05 am. 12:35 pm. 

Lv. Wayneavllle ... 10:30 am. 1:15 pm. 

Ar. Asheville 12:01 pm. 3:35 pm. 

MIXED TRAINS. 

NO. 64 NO. «5 

(Central Time.) 

Lv. Asheville 9:15pm. Ar. Asheville 1:15am. 

(Eastern Time.) 
Ar. Spart'b'g 5:30 am Lv. Spart'b'g 7:30 pm. 

NO. 62 NO. 6S 

(Central Time.) 
Lv. Asheville 6:30am. Ar. Asheville 7:15rm 
Ar. Salisbury 7:30pm. Lv. Salisbury 6:30am. 

NO. 66 NO. 65 

Ar. Asheville 6:35pm Ar. Morrist'n 11:30pm 
Lv. Morrist'n 9:39am. Lv. Asheville §:00am. 

Tranis Nos. 11 and 12. and 37 and 38, 
Pullman Sleeping cars between Nashville, 
Chattanooga, Knoxville, Hot Springa, 
Asheville, Washington and Jersey City. 

Trains Nos. 37, 11 and 12 Pullman Sleep- 
ing car, between Augusta and Charlotte. 

Trains Nos 11 and 12, 9 and 10 PullmaD 
Sleepers, between Cincinnati, Asheville, 
Columbia, Savannah and Jacksonville. 

Trains 15 and IS, Pullman Sleeping car 
between Norfolk. Raleigh, Greensboro, 
Salisbury, Asheville. Knoxville, Chatta- 
nooga and Nashville. 

J. M. CULP. Traffic Manager, Washing- 
ton. 
W. A. TURK S. H. HARDWICK, 

Gen'l Pass. Agt, Asst. Gen'l Pass. Agt. 
Washington, D. C. Atlanta, Oa 

C. A. BENSCOTER, Assistant General Pas 

senger Agent, Chattanooga. Tenn. 
F.R.DARBY. 0. P. ft T. A.. Asheville. N C 




e 




For the Sake of Others. 

Lord help me ever more to keep 

This promise that I make; 
I will not chew, nor smoke, nor swear, 

Nor poison-liquors take. 
I'll try to get my little friends 

To make this promise too; 
And every day I'll try to find 

Some helpful work to do. 



Weaverville, N. C. 

An elegant new building containing 
seven rooms has been added, and the old 
building has been remodeled with a new 
front. There are fifteen acres of laud, 
which, when improved, will afford am- 
ple and beautiful grounds for the cam- 
pus. 

The .location of Weaverville is one of 
the finest in the South, high elevasion, 
pure water, health record unequaled, a 
community of moral and religious citi- 
zens. No Saloons. 

A telephone line connects Weaverville 
with Asheville. 

Weaverville offers full courses in Sci- 
ence, Mathematics, Ancient and Modern 
Languages, English Literature, History, 
Music and Art. 

Expenses for a year range from jtioo 
to $125. 

The next session opens Sept. S, 1897. 

For full information, send for cata- 
logue. 

M. A. YOST, President. 

J. E. RHEIM, Secretary. 

A sad sight is to be seen any Sunday 
on any road leading into town — numbers 
of little boys and sometimes girls, going- 
out of the city with their cows to hold 
them by roadsides to graze. Whose 
children are these ? We pity them, for 
they are being reared like heathen of a 
thousand years ago. There is no reason 
for their absence from God's house on 
the Sabbath, except the indifference of 
their Godless parents. Little children 
love -to go to Sunday-school. How 
great the responsibility of parents ! How 
great the condemnation of indifferent 
parents ! — Church Echo. 



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10 



THE E P W O R T II N E W S 



LAND OF THE SKY, 

The Charms of Asheville and Bilt» 
mor.' — Tennessee Centen- 
nial Exposition, 



There are no more beautiful or delecta- 
ble resorts in America, at all times of the 
year than Asheville and Biltmore, situated 
upon the lofty crests of the Blue Ridge 
Mountains, in Western North Carolina, the 
fabled "Land of the Sky." 

Ever since the charms of this wonderful 
and most fascinating region became known 
to the traveling public, it has been the 
Mecca of all who love to dwell in the choice 
abodes of nature. And nature has indeed 
been exceedingly generous in the besiowal 
of her gifts in respect to the "Land of the 
Sky." Never was a country blessed with 
a more salubrious or equable climate pnev., 
er was a country invested with such lovely, 
romantic ar.d chaste scenery, as this mar- 



in the most picturesque fashion, and in the 
pretty park adjacent are the handsome 
homes of the favored inhabitants. The 
climate is singularly pure, dry and brac- 
ing and possesses to a remarkable degree 
the qualities which tend to promote health 
and pleasure. The number of clear days is 
very high for the average year. In the 
winter the climate is very mild, yet ex- 
tremely bracing. In summer, the charm of 
outdoor life is inexpressible. 

The air is warm and genial, yet not op- 
pressive, on account of dryness, and the 
nights are delightfully cool and conducive 
to restfulness and sweet repose. The great 
resort hotel of Asheville is the Battery park 
—a magnificent home whioh exemplifies the 
highest degree of luxury and good taste. 
No words of commendation are needed for 
this famous house, standing proudly upon 
a noble eminence, of its sumptuous fur- 
nishings, or of its peerless cusine or ser- 
vice. The fame of the house is world- 
Wide, 



derful thermal springs are administered) 
with the most excellent results. 

THE ROUTE 

Is via the Southern railway, with splendid- 
ly arranged and magnificently appointed 
through car service. Pullman drawing- 
room sleeping cars between New York, 
Washington and Nashville — where the Ten- 
nessee centennial exposition is now in prog 
ress — through the "Land of the Sky" — 
Knoxville and Chattanooga — Lookout Moun 
tain, the scene of the "Battle Above the 
Clouds. '* The Norfolk and Chattanooga 
limited, daily, between Norfolk, Raleigh, 
Durham, Greensboro. Salisbury (with Con- 
ner; ion from New York, Washington and 
Virginia), and Nashville, through Ashe- 
ville, Hot Springs, Knoxville and Chatta- 
nooga. This train carries Pullman's fin- 
est drawing-room buffet sleeping ears be- 
tween Norfolk and Nashville, and elegant 
vestibuled daily coaches between Norfolk 
and Chattanooga. Pullman drawing-innn. 




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ARE YOU.. 
GOING 
TO 



MARRY 



YOU may think that an impertinent question, but we have 
a reason for asking. We have established a reputation 

for getting out 

Attractive 
Wedding Invitations 

and supposed you would be interested. Write for 
samples. 

ASHEVILLE PRINTING CO. 



GEO. L. HACKNEY, Manager. 



3 E. COURT SQUARE, 




Mmwwfwwwmmmwm 



velous region of the Southland. Sweeping 
with the eyes the vast expanse of nature 
on every hand, the grandeur of the crea- 
tion — of the growth and embellishement of 
of cosmic life, rises up and unfolds be- 
fore the enraptured vision with imperial 
splendor, displaying scenes of rarest vir- 
tue and enchantment. 

Through the mountain ranges of the 
"Land of the Sky" the devious crurses of 
the beautiful French Broad river marks a 
succession of glorious vistas of cosmic life. 
The high-walled canons, or the tree clad 
peaks, standing sentinel on either hand 
form a wonderful setting to this sparkling 
river as it flows onward toward the sea. 

The three famous resorts of the "Land of 
the Sky" are Asheville, Biltmore and H t 
Springs. These may be considered separa- 
tely: 

Asheville is an enterprising city, nestled 
amid the imperial ranges that mark the 
"Land of the Sky," and has all the indicia 
of a live and progressive municipality. It 
is distinctly a resort city, and is graced 
with numerous palatial villas, taseteful cot 
tages and grand hotels. Its streets are ro- 
mantic, tree-shaded drives, winding about 



Biltmore. This place is some two milts 
from Asheville, and partakes of the same 
general character, in respect to scenery, 
climate and general attractions. But the 
place takes its name from the imperial 
chateau of Mr. George W. Vanderbilt, the 
most magnificent palace in America — a ver 
itable rival of the royal abodes of the Old 
World. The splendid gardens and the 
great farm adjacent to the castle at Bilt- 
more are worthy of a journey of many 
miles to see. At Biltmore is a palat al h i- 
tel. entirely in keeping with the place, 
known as the Kenilworth Inn. an ideal 
place of abode, and 'the resort of the best 
people of the land. The equipment, cu- 
sine and service of this now famous hous^ 
are equal to the best high-class city h jt.els. 
And uo_effort is spared to maintain the 
standard of excellence in every respect. 

Hot Springs. Situated in a charming 
plain in the midst of a vast wilderness — 
not far from Asheville — and surrounded by 
the most beautiful peaks, is the little city 
of Hot Springs. There is the Mountain 
Park hotel, a charming home for the health 
or pleasure seeker, ami a most excellent 
sanitarium, where the waters of the won- 



s'ieeping cars are also operated between 
Jacksonville and Cincinnati, through Sa- 
vannah, Columbia, Spartanburg, Asheville. 
Knoxville and Harriman Junction. 

Visitors to the Tennessee centennial ex- 
position at Nashville will find a visit to 
Asheville or vicinity most delightful and 
valuable. The Southern railway now has 
in press its annual "Summer Homes and 
Resorts" folder, containing a full list of 
the many delightful resorts, hotels and 
summer homes on its line, which will be 
mailed by the general passenger agent or 
to any address upon receipt of postage — 
two cents. 



Mr. S. R. Crockett, the well-known nov- 
elist, has done his best to rescue the fame 
of the literary agent from further calumny. 
He writes as follows to Mr. Watt: "You 
believed in my future when few did, and 
gave your time and thought with a grner- 
ous liberality which I should be oa'tiff and 
recreant if I did not amply acknowledge. 
You took the burden of worry off my 
shoulders. I cannot think of anything 
more fortunate in my brief literary past 
than the fact that I had the unusual good 
sense to place my affairs, right from the 
beginning, in your capable and entir ly 
fait' fill lvn:?,."' 



THE EP WORT II NEWS 



11 



The Normal and 
Collegiate Institute. 

For Young Women. 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



FALL TERM beginning- Sept. 23, 1897. 
Offers to the student: 

I. A Normal course for the thorough train- 
ing of teachers under instructors from the best 
Normal schools, embracing careful instruction 
jn the most improved methods of teaching 1 , with 
practice in the model school. 

II. A fully organized Commercial course for 
ihe preparation of young 1 women for office work 
embracing; Stenography Type writing-, Book- 
keeping" (single and double entry}, Penmanship, 
Commercial Arithmetic and Correspondence. 

III. A course in Domestic Science, [a] in 
which the pupil is taug"ht to draught, cut, fit, 
make garments and millinery; [b] to prepare a 
meal which shall be healthful, economic and 
appetizing". The teachers in these departments 
are from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Systematic study of the Bible in all depart- 
ments. 

A specialty is made of Health Culture under 
one of the best teachers in the South. 

By special enactment of the legislature of 
North Carolina, graduates from the Normal 
Department are exempted from examination 
when applying" for positions in the public 
schools of the state. 

Cost of board and tuition in any of the depart- 
ments $50 per term, or S100 for the school year. 
No extras except music. 

For catalogue address 

Rev. Thos. Lawrence, D. D., 

Asheville, N. C. 



Frank B. Miller 



INTERIOR 
DECORATOR 



Fine Wall Paper, 
Water and Oi! Colors. 

Odd Fellows Building, 
1(5 Church Street. 

ASHEVILLE, N. 0. 

Phone 292. 

DEALER IN 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Wall 

Papers, Lincmsta - Walton 

Fresco and Relief Work. 



is 



This has been a saying used by man 
for many generations, but it has not 
been used by things that can't talk until 
the collars spoke to the cuffs at the 
Asheville Steam Laundry after using 
their famous Domestic Finish. The 
remark was called forth by the experi- 
ence of the collars and cuffs that they 
lived so much longer under the new 
system, than with the gloss finish. Cus- 
tomers can have either, but we advise 
the Domestic. 

ASHEVILLE STEAM LAUNDRY 

J. A. NICHOLS, Proprietor, 
43 West College st. Ashkvili,e, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

AND 

COLPORTAGE AGENCY. 

I solicit orders from all cur 
Sunday Schools aud Churches for 
all supplies of Hymn and Song 
Books, Sunday School Literature, 
Libraries, Bibles, Record Books, 
etc., etc. 

I can supply the Holman Self 
Pronouncing, the International, 
the Oxford and othor Teachers' 
Bibles as low and often lower than 
you will find them elsewhere. 
Also family and smaller hand and 
pocket Bibles and Testaments. 
The life of Dr Chas. F. Deems at 
$1.50 just out. The Young Peoples 
new Sunday School song books, 
note addition at $3.60 per dozen, 
post paid, either round or shaped 
note. Word addition $1.25 per 
dozen, post paid. 

Any proper book furnished, no 
matter where published. 

N.R. RICHARDSON, 

High Point, N. C. 
Colporl age Agent of the W. N. C. 
Conference of the M. E. Church, 
South. 



A Great Harvest for Agents. 

Holiday Sales Over 25,000 in One Month. 



ils\V'~=g£ 






-i These new Books are selling' fastei' 
and doing more good than any other 
religions books on the market. The 
Children's Edition has 128 pages, 
fully illustrated with 42 large new 
cuts, size 6x8 inches. Price in heavy 
board covers, 35 cts. Cloth, GO ct>;. 
Large Edition, cloth, 320 pages, 
price, §1.00. ACEXTS MAK1XU 

FROM S20.00 TO S30.00 PER WEEK. 



AVERAGE SALES 10,500 PER MONTH. 

A little gir., i3 years old, made $7.50 in one clay. A crippled boy made $40. 00 in two 
weeks. A man made $12.50 in one day. Another *>31.00 in one week. Another $40 00 in 
eight days. Another made $127.00 in fifteen days, and other agents have had equal 
success. It makes little difference whether you have had experience as an agent or 
not. Fairly presented, these books will sell themselves. Everybody will 
want them. 

From the multitudes of testimonials we quote just a few: 

Central Congregationalist: ''Many of the incidents are exceedingly pathetic, and 
can scarcely fail to stir any tender heart to tears. 

The Union Signal, organ of the W. C. T. U.: "This book is neither doctrinal not 
denominational, yet distinctly Christian. Its high religious tone, its fascinating spirit 
and the high rank of its contributors make it a strong faith tonic and an inspiration U 
prevailing prayer." 

Michigan Christian Advocate: "The larger issue of this work has been widely ci- 
culated and read. This cheaper edition (illustrated) contains such selections as are cai 
cuiated to interest and instruct children. The incidents are very pathetic." 

Write at once for terms to Aeents. He early in the field. A copy of cji -i 
book is all the outfit needed. These will be sent, postpaid, on receipt of price, and h i ; 
of this amount will be credited to your account as soon as you order half a dozen \ 
more hooks. Write at once to 

S. B. SHAW, Publisher, 25 Canal St., Grand Rapids, Mic" 

i-^"' We ship books from Cincinnati. Ohio. Mention this paper when you writ*' 
Suscial inducements to Sunday Schools that want hooks. 



12 



THE E P W O R T H X E W S 



rl3CK6t 

News 



30 South Main St. 
ASHEVIILE, N. C. 



If I have a single customer has been unfairly treated or made a 
purchase at our store that he was displeased with or lias ever seen a 
statement in one of my advertisements that was not true, I do not 
know it, and would thank the man or woman to let me know it. Of 
course I have sold to numbers of my best customers shoes and other 
things that I told them were good, and I thought they were, but 
proved to be almost worthless. This will occur in any store but my 
customers knew I would make it satisfactory as soon as they let me 
know it. We have, as you know, the greatest variety store in Ashe- 
ville and our facilities for handling jobs and bankrupt stocks "are 
unsurpassed, and if yon wish to save money try us. 

J. M. STONEK. 




Crack Styles in 
Fine Clothing and 
Dress Goods. 

Many choice things just to hand — the pick 
of the market — foreign and domestic, and 
as yet almost no Dingley tariff on them. 

We do not wish to be alarmists, but any 
one can see that with any movement what- 
ever in goods the near future will show 
prices out of harmony with attenuated 
pocket books. 

H. REDWOOD & CO. 

7 and 9 Pattern Avenue. 



Jeweler. 



Souvenirs, North Carolina Gems. 



Eastman's Pocket Kodaks 
and Bull's Eye Kodaks 
and Supplies. 



No. 27 PATTON AVENUE. 



Kid Gloves 



are the most essential items for stylish dress. Our line for this season surpasses 
' any shown by us heretofore. It is our hobby to sell you the best for the least 
price. The " Germania," — our own trade mark — stamped with our name and 
imported direct — are the Gloves we sell under a bona fide guarantee. 

Why pay $1.50 to get their equal when we sell ours for $1.00? 

All Seasonable Colors. After diligent efforts we have succeeded in being able 
to offer a line of good Kid Gloves at 75c. They are fully as good as those usual- 
ly sold for $1.00 and $1.25. All shades. See them. 

OESTREICHER & COMPANY, 

28 SOUTH MAIN STREET. 



t 





1 - 



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♦ 



- *. 

-ft 

A 







[worth Church. 



PUBLISHED IN THE INTEREST OF THE EPWORTH LEAGUES OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



VOL. VI. 



ASHEVILLE, N. C, OCTOBER i, 1897. 



No. 



A 

t 

-♦.♦>- 

t 



Salisbury District. 

China Grove Circuit has begun the 
erection of a new church. 

Rev. J. E. Thompson has just closed a 
fine revival at Central church, Concord. 
• 
Rev. \V. P. McGhee is having the par- 
sonage at Ba}-'s Chapel, Concord, paint- 
ed. 

• 

Bro. Scroggs tells us that prospects 
are very encouraging all over the dis- 
trict. 

• 

Rev. A. L. Coburn has arranged to 
build a parsonage at Chestnut Hill. 
Chestnut Hill is coming to the front. 
• 
Steps have beeu taken to build a 
church at Vance Cotton Mills. This will 
make four Methodist churches for Salis- 
bury. 

• 

Rev. D. P. Tate has begun the erection 
of a parsonage at Spencer, which will be 
ready for occupancy by conference. Bro. 
Tate has added to the membership about 
100 thus far this conference year. 
• 

Rev. A. L. Coburn tells us that the 
Methodists of China Grove have awak- 
ened to their need and have purchased 
a lot on which a church building will be 
erected shortly. — Salisbury World. 
• 

Brother, if you have an idea of mov- 
ing at the coming conference keep it to 



yourself. Many a brother has created 
the necessity for a removal by too much 
talk. Too much inconsiderate talk will 
rise up at conference and greatly embar- 
rass j-our prospects. People will demand 
your removal when they find out that 
you are dissatisfied. Many preachers 
charge the presiding elder with afflict- 
ing them when their own imprudence 
alone is responsible for it. 



The W. N. C. Conference. 

Conference will soon be here. Yes, 
conference will soon be here. As Sa- 
mautha Allen would say, it makes a 
Methodist preacher "sythe" deeply to 
hear those words pronounced. They 
mean a great deal to him. Perhaps the 
salary is not more than half paid, and 
he does not see how he can make ends 
meet if it does not come in full, ft maybe 
he has been compelled to go in debt dur- 
ing the 3 T ear, and the expenses of going 
to conference must be provided for. Per- 
haps a move is in anticipation, and the 
family must have clothing as well as 
traveling expenses. 

Now, brother steward, what are you 
going to do about it? What is your duty 
in the matter? The preacher looks to 
you for his money. Your preacher has 
been faithful and you ought to pay him. 
Common honesty requires it. God re- 
quires it. Go to that man with even- 
dollar on your list collected and see if 
you do not receive a blessing that there 
is scarcely room to contain. Then the 



conference collections are to come. The 
heathen need the gospel, and the mis- 
sionary needs bread. When the worn- 
out preachers have received every dollar 
allowed them many of their wants will 
still be unmet. Every cause to which 
you are called to contribute is worth}', 
and not a dollar too much has been as- 
sessed for it. Then in almost every in- 
stance the church is fully able to meet 
all these demands. Then rally to the 
help of your pastor, and help him make 
a full report at conference. Let each 
member of the church be called upon to 
act a part and not leave all to the preach- 
er and stewards. Whether in an official 
position or not you are concerned for the 
honor of Zion. Brother, do your duty, 
not grudgingly, or of necessity, for God 
loveth a cheerful giver. Remember, 
that what measure ye meet shall be 
measured to you again. 



Much interest is being manifested in 
special meetings held at Jonesville, N. 
C, by the pastor, Rev. W. L. Sherrill, 
assisted by Rev. Miles H. Long. 



Rev. J. W. Lee will assist Rev. H. L. 
Atkins in special services to commence 
at Church .Street Church, Charlotte, on 
Oct. 10th. 

Rev. H. L. Atkins, of Charlotte, had 
the misfortune to lose his pocket book 
recently on the train near Waxhaw. The 
pocket book was afterwards found, but 
the contents, about #15, had been re- 
moved. 



^ 



J^J^J^j^^^^J^J!*. ^^>^^4>^ ♦ $ » ♦$» « :i » ;$ » «& $ $ $ $ $ %k ?$ t $ $ : 



T HE E P W O R T H N E AY S 



FURNITURE 




CARPETS, 

Mattings, Linoleum, Shades, Etc. 

A COMPLETE STOCK. 

Don't fail to See the many New Things 
we can show you. 

W. B. WILLIAMSON & CO, 

Furniture, Carpets, etc. 
10 Patton Ave. ASHEVILL1S, N. C. 



Asheyille College, 

or Girls and Young Women, 

Offers College Courses with degrees: 

Seminary Courses with diploma, and 

Preparatory School of best type which admits 
to Wellesley on certificate. 

Music, Art, and Elocution Schools of highest 
order. 

Home Equipments 

Modern and Elegant. 

For particulars address the President. 

ARCHIBALD A. JONES, 

Asbevillo, N. C. 



TOO OffE 
i CALL. 



Why not pay it at once while you can get ''high 
tariff'" values at "anti-tariff" prices. 

A high tariff is now in effect, but we bought before it went 
on, hence can sell 20 to 25 per cent, cheaper now than a little 
later. 

Try our $10 suits — equal to $12.50 or $15 high tariff suits. 

All others in propottiou. 

Try our 4-ply-2ioo Linen 10 cent collars; 

And our unexcelled 10 cent or $1 per doz. sox. 

Alexander & Courtney, 

Clothiers, Haberdashers, Hatters, 

TAILORS. 



50 Patton Ave. 



Drhumor Block. 



east Your Eyes 
n These Prices. 

DRESS GOODS. 



Very pretty Plaids for I2}4c 
Very pretty Plaids for 15c 
Very pretty Plaids for 25c 
Very pretty Plaids lor 39c 
Very pretty Plaids for 50c 
Very pretty Plaids for 59c 
Very pretty Plaids for 75c 



25c 
29c 
50c 
85c 
98c 



All wool Aldiue Suitings 
All wool fig. col'd " 
Fine Suitings 
Fine Coverts, 52-in wide 
Fine suit patterns (indiv.) 
Fine suit patterns (indiv.) 
fl to $1.50 per yd 

Fine black dress goods in all the new weaves, 20c to $2 per yrl 

Cloth velvet suitings in all colors, #1.50 per yd 

Good black Taffeta silk 65c 

Better black Taffeta silk 75c to $1.25 per yd 

Roman stripe silks S5C to $1.25 per yd 

Plaid silks 50c to $1.25 per yd 

Changeable Taffetas 75c — all silk 

Changeable silk 25c 

Black Peau de Soi silk $1 to $1.25 

Black Armure silk 85c and $1 

China and Japanese silks 50c and up 



Bon EVIarche, 

15 South Main St, 



THE EIMYORTII NEWS 



3 



ftbe £pwortb ftews* 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY. 



GEO. L. HACKNEY 

Kn. D.ATKINS.D.I). | 



Editor 

IJev. T. F. MAE r Associate Editors 

Miss'M. BESSIE ALLEN. Editor Jr. Dept. 

SUBSCRIPTION KATES. 

One Year, in advance. 50ctS 

Six Months, in advance 2T» '• 

Three Months* in advance 15 " 



Send subscriptions and address all communi- 
cations to the Publisher. 

GEO. T,. HACKNEY. 

Aslteville. N. C. 

This page is Edited by Dr. Atkins. 



There are now about 115.000 Chinamen 
in this country. 



In Lower Bengal, India, there are 30.332 
married girls and 6,780 widows under 4 
years of age. 



The numiher of members in mission 
churches has increased in the past year 
64.000. 



The Methodist Episcopal church is mov- 
ing up, paying its missionary debt, which 
now is nearly $200,000. 



Dr. Hoss is making the tour of our ex- 
treme western conferences. He writes en- 
tertainingly of his journey, Yellowstone 
park and other places. 



The total contributions for missions in 
the world show an increase over- last year 
of $1,100,000. In the United States there 
■is a falling off of $70,000. 



Miss Lochie Rankin is at home from Chi- 
na on a visit. She says whole families in 
Nantziang are joining the church, and our 
work is strongly entrenched in the hearts 
of the people. 



A Christian man in London has recently 
donated to the church missionary society 
$150,000. Why not? Let it come by hun- 
dreds, thousands, and hundreds of "thous- 
ands. Why not say also millions? 



A year and a half ago nine missionaries 
were massacred in Puhken. China. As a 
direct result of this 20.000 persons have 
applied for membership in the church, and 
5,000 have been received. What wonderi 
God can do. 



Dr. Lamberth recommends very highly 
a ninety-six page pamphlet on China's peo- 
ple and their customs, her needs, hind- 
rances to missionary work and a compara- 
tive view of Christianity and Confucianism. 
Price 20 cents. Get it. 



Senator J. L. McLaurin nominated, and 
to be elected U. S. Senator for South Car- 
olina is said to be a first cousin to our 
Brother McLaurin. a member of our con- 



ference. None the worse for that. He is 
a steward in our church. 



The secretary of state for India says: 
"The government of India cannot but ac- 
knowledge the great obligation under 
which it is laid by the benevolent exertions 
of missionaries, whose blameless examples 
and self-denying labors are infusing new 
vigor into the stereotyped life of the great 
population placed under English rule." 



One of the missionaries in Japan says 
"Buddhism as a religion is dead, but in a 
body as large as it is, and petrified at that, 
there is an immense force simply in its 
inertia." He thinks Japan ought to be 
divided up into circuits for systematic, 
thorough preaching, and pastoral work. 



One of the largest Sunday schools in 
China is an Anglo-Chinese Sunday school 
in Shanghai. Eighteen teachers and 160 
pupils. The Sunday schools are in session 
there about the time we retire on Satur- 
day night. That is a good time to pray 
for them. 



An important amendment to New Jer- 
sey's constitution is now before the people 
prohibiting lotteries and gambling of ev- 
ery sort. There is good authority for say- 
ing that for years that state has been cor- 
rupted and disgraced by this shameful evil. 
We rejoice to see the people trying to rid 
themselves of vice and are glad to see con- 
stitutions conform to the better sentiment 
of the best people. 



It is stated by good authority that Rev. 
Thomas Dixon, jr.. a somewhat sensational 
pastor of a church in New York, resides in 
Cape Charles, and spends most of his time 
in his six thousand-dollar yacht on the 
bay, going to the city Saturday night and 
returning Monday morning. Yet he poses 
as a reformer. 

Whether this is true of him or not, such 
a minister is Christless and fruitless. 



Bishop McCabe has added another inno- 
vation by asking the South Kansas confer- 
ence to cast a ballot indicating their choice 
for presiding elders. He told them he 
would not promise to appoint the same, but 
he did. Thus slowly 'but surely Episcopal 
prerogative is waning, and the government 
of the Methodist church is going into the 
hands of the people. 



Rev. Frank Siler has been transferred to 
our conference from the Missouri confer- 
ence. This is his native heath, having 
been born and reared in Macon county. He 
is not therefore a transfer in any disabling 
sense, and will'be warmly welcomed to all 
the rights and privileges at once, as though 
he had never been from us. 



Dr. Morrison is making gratifying prog- 
ress on the missionary debt. We expect 
the next annual report to notice its entire 
liquidation. We trust also that this effort 
has given us some object lessons in ability 



to give for Christ that will not be lost to 
the church, and that a new era of enlarge- 
ment 'may dawn upon our foreign missioa 
work. Let every league 'be cultivating the 
mission spirit. 



Abel Stevens, D.D., died in San Jose.Cal., 
of heart's disease Sept. 11, eighty-two 
years old. He was one of the grand char- 
acters of 'Methodism, a chief historian, ed- 
itor of Zion's Herald, editor of the Nation- 
al Magazine, editor of Christian Advocate 
and Journal, and associate editor of the 
Methodist. Of peculiar interest to south- 
erners is the fact that he was conservative 
on slavery. He was an abolitionist, but 
held that slaveholders had a constitutional 
right to church membership and thought 
nothing should be done 'by the church to 
embarrass the border churches adhering 
north. His History of Methodism is a 
monument to his scholarship and ability. 



The true basis of church membership is 
not mere morals — a negative thing, but 
active Christian service. The charter of 
the church involves making Christians as 
the work of every individual. The League 
is preeminently given to this work, con- 
stantly emphasizes it and undertakes to 
learn the art and bring it to pass in all. 
Let Leaguers join with this view, and 
keep this work constantly before them. 
Have you ever really tried to lead any one 
to Christ? If not, begin at once, and nev- 
er cease. You may not succeed at first, 
you may never succeed, but you can try 
all your life and your efforts will not be 
lost. You may be even repulsed and scorn- 
ed. In this you will realize likeness to 
your Lord. You will learn patience and 
endurance, and that will make you strong 



Another conference year with us will 
soon be closed. The reports will be in 
and the account rendered. What shall it 
be? Have the stewards done their full 
duty? This has 'been done only when ev- 
ery member has been thoroughly canvassed 
and the claims fully presented. Gen- 
erally defects are due to delinquency here. 
But some members seem not to have the 
proper sense of obligation here. The sal- 
aries are all barely a living. If they fall 
short your pastor will be greatly disap- 
pointed, and put to great straits. We con- 
fidently believe every salary can be paid 
If all will not do their part there are enough 
enlightened ones on every charge to di- 
vide the deficit and pay it rather than 
dump it all off on the man, and that your 
beloved pastor who has preached to you, 
visited you in sickness, buried your dead, 
etc. Do not send the Lord's servant away 
empty handed. Give him his dues. 

Are the pastors delinquent in presenting 
the conference claims? You think the 
stewards deficient. What sort of stew- 
ard do you make? Do your best. Preach 
in the subject. Explain every item to the 
people, and let them see the business in 
it. Let every member keep in mind the 
solemn vow to support the institutions of 
the church. Don't say you don't believe 
in this and that. Be loyal and do your 
part. See that every claim is met. 



T H E E P AY O R T II N E W S 



Sketches of the Past. — No. 14. 

BY DR. J. A. REAGAN. 

At the solicitation of many friends, I 
have concluded to give a sketch occa- 
sionally. In 1S47 I was traveling the 
Tazewell Circuit in Virginia. Dr. Tip- 
pett came through 013- circuit, acting as 
Bible Agent, and requested me to go 
with him down the Maiden fork of San- 
dy, to preach and distribute Bibles and 
Testaments. 

We emptied our saddle-pockets of all 
clothing, and filled them with God's 
Word. This country was a very rough 
one in many respects. The country was 
rough, and the people, at that time, 
rougher. The sheriff told me that men 
frequently swapped wives, and one 
would give boot. 

On reaching that couutry near night, 
we stopped at a nun's house named 
Shortridge. He and the woman he lived 
with were said not to be married, yet it 
was the best house we found on our trip. 
When we rode up there were some fif- 
teen or more meu working the road near 
there. Dr. Tippett told them we were 
preachers, and if they and their families, 
and neighbors would come back, one of 
us would preach to them that night — 
Shortridge having given permission. 

Night came ami we concluded the 
meeting was a failure. There were two 
houses. We waited until at least one 
hour after dark, when Shortridge came 
in and said they have come. They had 
waited outside until all arrived then the 
announcement was made. Mr. Short- 
ridge brought in a light of pine-wood, 
and all came in at once and filled the 
room. It fell to my lot to preach to 
them. They behaved well, and paid 
good attention. 

The next day Dr. Tippett had an ap- 
pointment near the Kentucky line, at a 
place call Slate School house. The con- 
gregation was not large, and while the 
Doctor was preaching some lay down on 
the benches, and all seemed not to know 
how to act. 

We stayed that night at Sawyer's. The 
next day, Sunday, we had a house full 
of rough looking people. I preached — 
had good order and good attention. Af- 
ter I concluded, Dr. T. said to me, "they 
behaved so well, I believe I will preach." 
So he began, and in fifteen minutes the 
people began to get up and go out, and 
to strike flints and light punk to light 
their pipes. In a short time three- 
fourths of the congregation was out side. 
The Doctor said to me, "I believe I will 
quit." I sanctioned it, and he said, 
"shall I dismiss them?" I replied, "if 
yon do you will have to call them in." 
So he quit without dismissing, the con- 



gregation. When we went out they 
gathered around me and wanted me to 
come back and preach to them, but paid 
no attention to Dr. Tippett, who was a 
fine preacher — much better than I was. 
I told them I would see the Bishop, and 
have a preacher sent them from confer- 
ence, which I did, and a Brother Mitch- 
ell was sent there as a missionary. 

After preaching we went back to 
Shortridge's. The old lad)' said, "I ex- 
pected you, and would have had dinner 
ready, but I sent the boys out to kill 
squirrels and they were late coming in." 
(Remember, this was Sunday.) We 
stayed all night there and left for my 
circuit next morning. 

I must say, rough as they were, I nev- 
er met a kinder people. In their way, 
the)- did all they conld to make us com- 
fortable, and in every way seemed to 
appreciate oui visit. I have no doubt 
but they have changed greatly s : nce 
then, and I would like to visit that sec- 
tion now to see the improvement, as 
they have had regular preaching from 
that conference, and I have no doubt 
but church houses have been built, and 
a general reformation in manners and 
conduct have taken place. May the 
good Lord prosper them spiritually. 

Weaverville, N. C. 



Certainty of Moral Truth. 

BY REV. W. H. BATES. 

I was glad to receive a copy of your 
nice and breezy publication, The Ep- 
worth News, which I perused with pleas- 
ure. 

There is a sentence or two on the first 
page that is liable to be misunderstood, 
and might thereby do harm. You say: 

"A mathematical problem can be de- 
monstrated to a certainty, not so moral 
truth. All moral truth has about it an 
element of uncertainty, simply because 
some of its bearings are beyond the reach 
of the human intellect." 

Are not all experiential doctrines con- 
ditioned upon obedience? "He that be- 
lieveth on the Son, hath the witness in 
himself." I. John 3. "If an)- man do 
His will, said Jesus, he shall know of 
the doctrine whether it be of God." 
"No man knoweth the Son but the Fa- 
ther, and no man knoweth the Father 
but the Son, and he to whom the Son 
will reveal him." Of course this rev- 
elation is conditioned upon the faith 
of him who receives it. 

While one man may not be able to de- 
monstrate moral truth to another, it does 
not necessarily follow that "there is an 
element of uncertainty about all moral 
truth." Surely not. Hear the Apostle 
Paul. Eph. 3, 14. "For this cause I 
bow mv knees — that he would grant vou 



according to the riches of his glory, to 
be strengthened with might by his Spirit 
in the inner man; that Christ may dwell 
in your hearts by faith, that ye being 
rooted and grounded in love may be able 
to comprehend with all saints, what is 
the breadth and length, and depth and 
height, and to know that love which 
passeth knowledge, (of the intellect but 
revealed by faith) that ye might 
be filled with all the fullness of 
God." Eph. 1, 18. "After I heard of 
your faith in the Lord Jesus, cease not 
to give thanks for you, making mention 
of you in my prayers; that the God of 
our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of 
glory, would give unto you the Spirit of 
wisdom and revelation in the knowledge 
of Him; the eyes of your understanding 
being enlighted; that ye ma)' know what 
is the hope of his calling, and what the 
riches of the glory of his inheritance in 
the saints, and what is the exceeding 
greatness of his power to usward, who 
believe, according to the working of the 
mighty power which he wrought in 
Christ when he raised him from the 
dead," etc. 

If there is anything uncertain here, I 
fail to see it. 

Knox ville. Tenn. 



From Laurel Hill League. 

Editor News: I sometimes wonder if 
Christ would be accepted by the world if 
he were to come in like manner as he 
did in the days of Herod the king. And 
would he be accepted should he make 
his second advent into, the world. I fear 
there would be many professed Chris- 
tians found among the goats. 

There are too many who want to be 
"carried to the skies on flowery beds of 
ease." As soon as they are converted 
thev climb into the wagon, instead of 
helping their pastor pull it up the hill. 

It is true, we cannot expect as much 
of a new convert as of older Christians; 
but they should be ready to do God's 
bidding when they have the call. Let 
each one take hold and strive to acquire 
a stronger influence over the wicked — 
grasp them by the hand; invite them to 
the League. 

The greatest fault to be found is we do 
not pray enough. We should be upon 
our knees more. When we are despon- 
dent, and troubles cluster about us, if 
we will go God, believing and trusting, 
and leave self out, our troubles will flee 
as the shadows flee before the sun. The 
greatest comfort to be found is in secret 
prayer. When one can realize that 
death is nothing more than a shadow, 
and know they are going from life unto 
life, instead of from death unto death, 
thev must indeed be happv. 

J. C. Waters. 



PRUDENT PEOPLE PURCHASE PRESCRIPTIONS at Dr. T C.Smith's Drug Store, Public Square 



I 



T II E E P W O R T II N E W S 



Rev. W. R. Barnett. 

We see it announced that Rev. W. R. 
Barnett, D. D., has been transferred to 
the Holston Conference. Of course he 
has not been transferred yet, but we sup- 
pose will be when the Holston Confer- 
ence meets. We are loath to give the 
Doctor up. He is not only a good 
preacher, but is a good man. His integ- 
rity of character will bear any test. 
Methodism has no more loyal son than 
he. But we imagine other scenes and 
times have been bewitching the Doctor 
of late, and therefore his mind has turn- 
ed back to his first love. Eut let it be. 
There is nothing wrong about it. We hope 
he will find those early scenes invested 
with all the mellow light of June. Some- 
times, however, the light fades from 
them just as the bloom of youth fades 
from the cheek. Youthful joys forever 
haunt us, but so artful are they that ev- 
ery attempt to recapture them is eluded. 
We have visited the scenes of childhood, 
but lo! they had passed away; they were 
not there. We regret to give Bro. Barnett 
up, but if he be happier and render bet- 
ter service to the Master in the Holston 
Conference, we wish him God speed. 

T. F. M. 



e- 

* 

t 



THE JUNIOR DEPARTMENT. 



as the 
are at 



orders 



Insurance. 

Every perishable thing of value should 
be insured against loss. Whether it be 
houses or household goods, store or con- 
tents, life or limb, all should be insured. 
The soul is no exception. 

We do not teach Christianity as some 
people seem solely to regard it, as a sys- 
tem of Are insurance against loss in the 
next world. It is that and more: it in- 
sures a permanent heavenly home. But it 
is not so much the "bye-and-hye' 
"now-and-now" with which we 
present concerned. 

There are numerous fraternal 
that insure against want during sickness. 
The King's Insurance company assures us 
to all we need, all the time, in every con- 
dition. 

Examine a sample policy, such as Phil- 
ipplans 4:19: "But my God shall supply 
all your need according to his riches in 
glory by Christ Jesus." 

The Insurer, "my God;" insures, "shall 
supply;" amount of policy, "all your need;" 
assets of the company, "His riches;" loca- 
tion of company, "in glory;" Cashier, 
"Chirst Jesus." 

In this policy, God himself insures to 
those who meet the terms laid down in 
the fourth chapter of Phtlippians, all the 
necessaries of this life — not every whim 
and fancy, but all we really need. Cheer 
Up, Christian, and serve the Lord with 
gladness. You are not going to die in 
the poor-house, neither will your children 
be compelled to beg bread. 

What is your need today? Food? Rai- 
ment? Shelter? Or is it strength or wis- 
dom or grace? It makes no difference. 
Fill out the policy for what you need and 
put God to the test.— Hanleiter Lighter. 



\ Edited by MISS M. BESSIE ALLEN, 

Hf.ndersonvii.le, N. C. 

Like the Lilies. 



They do not toil: 
Content with their allotted task 
They do but grow; they do not ask 
A richer lot, a higher sphere. 
But in their loveliness appear, 
And grow, and smile, and do their best, 
And unto God they leave the rest. 



A Model Junior. 

There is a bright little Junior named 
Burge Tilton in New Harmony, Ind. He 
is five years of age, and has made a good 
name for himself by committing to mem- 
ory and reciting without error, before a 
large congregation, the sixty-six books of 
the Bible. He has also memorized verses 
of scripture beginning with the letters of 
our English alphabet. He is now learn- 
ing to repeat the ten commandments. 
Burge is a model leaguer, and is always 
present when he is not sick. His league 
pledge is: "I will read a portion of scrip- 
ture each day; I will pray each day; I will 
use no bad words." And when the pastor 
asks the Juniors whether they have kept 
all the pledge, Burge always answers. 
"All." He cannot read, but his mamma 
reads the scripture to him each day, and 
that is counted. -Burge was asked to at- 
tend the Evansville District Conference 
and recite the names of the books of the 
Bible, but he could not go. We want the 
Juniors of the world to know albout this 
good boy, and try to imitate him in keep- 
ing his pledge and reading the Bible. — Ep- 
worth Herald. 



Hard on Bovs. 



At a recent Bom'bay school board exami- 
nation for girls, one of the tasks was an 
essay on. boys, and this is one of the com- 
positions, just as it was handed in !>/ a 
girl of twelve: "The boy is not an ani- 
mal, yet they can be heard to a consider- 
able distance. When a boy hollers he op- 
ens his big mouth like frogs, bur girls hold 
their tongues till they are spoke to. aa<3 
then they answer respectable, and tell just 
how it was. A boy thinks himself clever, 
because he can wade where it is deep but 
Gr, 1 made made the dry land for every liv- 
ing thing, and rested on the sevifitr iKy. 
When the boy grows up he is called .1 hi.s- 
tand, and then he stops wad ng ;:n i stjvc 
out nights, but the grow up gn 1 is a wid- 
ow and keeps house." — Journal * ihe 
Hon t of the Merciful Savour, Thq T .-m- 
f.le Magazine. 



A Small Potato. 



twelve years old, who lived with him, 
"plant that, and you shall have all you 
can raise from it till you are of age." 

The Ibright little boy cut the potato into 
as many pieces as there were "eyes" in it 
and planted it. In the autumn he dug 
and laid by the increase of it, and planted 
that in the following spring. Next year he 
planted the larger crop gathered in the pre- 
vious autumn. The potatoes grew health- 
ily and did well, and his fourth year's har- 
vest amounted to 400 bushels. The farmer 
asked to be released from his bargain, for 
he saw the boy's planting would cover all 
his land. 

And yet it is quite common to despise 
"the day of small things." 



A Brown Paper flagnet. 

A very simple and interesting electrical 
experiment may be made with a sheet of 
brown paper, says the Paper World, illus- 
trating in a remarkable manner how the 
most astonishing effects may be produced 
by the simplest means. Take a sheet of 
coarse brown paper, and, after holding it 
before the fire until it is perfectly dry, 
fold it up into a long strip about two inches 
wide. The magnet is now complete. To 
exhibit its attractive power, cut some 
strips of writing paper, about three inches 
long and about as wide as one of tfcuse 
lines, then place them upon the table, 
three or four together. Now take the mag- 
net and draw it briskly under the arm two 
or three times. Its elctromagnetism is 
instantly developed, and becomes apparent 
when held over the small strips of writ- 
ing paper, for the fly. up from the table 
toward the paper magnet veritably "by 
the wings of lightning." — New York Ob- 
server. 



A man in Tolland, Conn., found a very 
small potato in one of his pockets when 
he came in from his work. 

"Here," said he, laughingly to a boy 



Funnigraph. 

The members of the Press Association 
who attended the Nashville Exposition 
will appreciate the following, sent us by 
"an occasional contributor:" 

On Train, Saturday 7.30 a.m. 

H. and I. in conversation: 

H. to I. — Why, what has become of 
our leader, Varner? Have not seen him 
in two days. 

I. to H. — I guess he has not tired of 
the Centennial yet. I think we left him 
there. 

L. H. P. from the east, to whom no 
remark was addressed, — I guess he is at 
Price College Hotel, waiting for his 
breakfast. 

Laughter from all the N. C. P. A. 
aboard. 



6 



T H E E P W O Pv T H N E W S 



dhe £pwortb Htews< 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY. 



GEO. L. HACKNEY Editor 

Kcv. D. ATKIXS.D.I). I , . . „ ... 

llev. T. E. MAKK, f Assoc.ate Editors 

MissM. BESSIE ALLEN. Editor Jr. Dept. 

SUBSCKIPTION KATES. 

One Year, in advance. 50 cts 

Six Months, in advance 25 '* 

Three Months, in advance 15 " 



Send subscriptions and address all communi- 
cations to the Publisher, 

GEO. I.. HACKNEY, 

Asheville, N. C. 

Asheville, N. C, October I, 1897. 



EDITORIAL. 

The Epworth News is just five years old. 
This issue is the first of the sixth volume, 
and it starts out on this new year of its 
life with increasing courage and hope. 
The circulation has constantly increased, 
and is now the best in its history. Pages 
have been added until we now run never 
less than twelve — often sixteen. New de- 
partments have been inaugurated from 
time to time and additional writers se- 
cured. It has never taken a backward 
step, but forward always. 

We are. very grateful to the conference 
and to the pastors generally for their 
kindly recognition and support. The 
Leaguers are our friends; this we appre- 
ciate. We are trying to make it helpful 
to the great army of Sunday school work- 
ers and every church enterprise. We 
would like to come out weekly, and will do 
so when our subscription list is doubled. 



Kneel when you pray, whether in the 
family or in the congregation. In some 
congregations there is a growing custom o£ 
sitting up and looking about, lounging and 
whispering during public prayer. 

This is all wrong. If you are at your 
own Methodist meeting where we kneel 
conform. If you are at a Presbyterian 
service where they stand reverently stand. 
In any case close your eyes and devoutly 
think of the Holy One whom we worship. 
Do not pray to or speak of the Holy Ghost 
as it— a mere thing. He is a person with 
all personal attributes. He sees us, hears 
us, speaks to us in His own way and takes 
possession of us. Call Him by name or use 
the masculine pronoun. 



The gallant Dr. Boss is responsible for 
the following: . The editor who thanks God 
that he is able to control his temper in 
public, but often lets it get the better of 
him at home, needs a heroic dose of self- 
examination. It is not just safe to go 
about the world saying insolent and ill- 
bred things to full-grown men, but there is 
no danger, except in rare cases, in being 
cross and rude to your wife and children. 
Any coward who has learned to put a 
check on himself in his intercourse with 
the world may work off his surplusage of 



sour temper upon the very persons to 
whom he ought to be most considerate and 
polite. It is not grace that gives him the 
manners of a gentleman abroad, but the 
wholesome fear of a thrashing. 



Two cigar dealers appeared before the 
board of aldermen last Friday night and 
asked that they be granted permission to 
sell cigars on Sunday as the fruit stands 
do. At first glance, this seems fair — if it 
is right for any one to sell cigars on Sun- 
day; but Christian people protest against 
anything being sold by the shops on Sun- 
day except drugs. "The Fatten avenue en- 
trance to the Eureka saloon" is through a 
cigar store, and it would be a bad idea to 
open an entrance to a saloon on Sunday. 
Don't forget to pray the "Lord's Prayer," 
Bro. Aldermen, before you grant this re- 
quest. 

It was very pleasant and profitable to 
be closely associated with Dr. T. N. Ivey 
and his estima'ble wife during our recent 
visit to Nashville. Aside from the excel- 
lent company which Bro. Ivey proved to 
be, it confirmed us in our belief that the 
North Carolina Advocate is in the hands of 
those who are well able to lead the 
thought and conserve the interests of 
North Carolina Methodism. We enjoyed 
also the companionship of Bro. Ivey's ex- 
cellent wife. Mrs. Ivey is a sister of W. 
C. Dowd. of the Charlotte News, and a 
cousin of Prof. Jerome Dowd of Trinity 
College. 



We are glad to hear of the very fine 
opening of Trinity college. The pros- 
pects for this year must indeed be grati- 
fying to those who have our college in 
charge. There are twelve young ladies 
now in the college and the woman's build- 
ing will be ready for occupancy by Janu- 
ary. There is large increase in attend- 
ance from the western conference, and at 
the present time the patronage has ex- 
ceeded that of any former year. 



We were very sorry to hear, just as we 
were going to press, of the very serious ill- 
ness of Rev. R. L. Sprinkle of the Cullo- 
whee circuit, Franklin district. The doc- 
tors have given up all hope of his recov- 
ery. Bro. Sprinkle is a most promising 
young man, and we sincerely trust his ill- 
ness may not prove fatal. His brother. 
Rev. H. C. Sprinkle, of North Wilkesboro, 
passed through the city, on his way to 
Webster, last Wednesday. 



We are much obliged to Bro. Boswell, 
the assistant editor of the Nashville Ad- 
vocate, for the following; The "Epworth 
News," of Asheville, N. C, is about in th* 
middle of the fifth year of its exisr;nce. 
It is a twelve-page paper, filled with good 
matter, and published at the low price of 
fifty cents a year. It is thoroughly Meth- 
odist and connectional in spirit." 



Bro. Troy and Tobacco. 

"Talking about tobacco reminds me of a 
little story of Mr. James Buttrick of Ashe- 
ville, who is down on tobacco. He teach- 
es his children that the use of tobacco is 
sinful because harmful. That's the idea. 
One day, laughingly, he said: "I want 
to tell you something; my boy, Turner, 
came home the other day and said, "Fath- 
er, I thought you said it was sinful to use 
tobacco?" 'So it is,' Mr. Buttrick replied. 
Then the 'boy with a look of surprise on 
his face, told his father that he had seen 
Mr. Troy smo'king a cigar. This thing got 
me. The English Wesleyans have great 
respect for their ministers. The boy 
thought, surely father must be mistaken. 
It was never my habit since entering the 
ministry to smoke publicly, and after Tur- 
ner caught me I quit and did not smoke 
again, with a very few exceptions, for 
nearly two years." — Rev. J. C. Troy, in 
North Carolina Advocate. 

The reader will notice that Bro. Troy on- 
ly smoked occasionally for "nearly two 
years." If it is a sin for a person to use 
tobacco at one time, is it not a sin to use 
it at another? Could not the same grace 
of God that kept Bro. Troy from using to- 
bacco for "nearly two years," keep him 
for a longer period? 



College Notes. 

Davidson college opened with an attend- 
ance of 160. 

The A. and M. College of Raleigh. N. C, 
opened with over 200 students. 

The school recently opened at Camp 
Academy, near Leicester, is doing well. 
Prof. A. C. Reynolds, a Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity man, is the principal. 



Rev. Plato T. Durham of Charlotte, has 
gone to New York city to enter Union 
Theological Seminary. 



Revival Notes. 

Rev. D. H. Tuttle of Beaufort, is help- 
ing Rev. S. B. Turrentine in a meeting at 
Trinity church. Charlotte. 

The meeting recently closed at our 
church at Wadesboro. N. C, resulted in 
about thirty accessions to the church. Rev. 
Parker Holmes was assisted bv Rev. W. M. 
Robbins of Monroe. 

The meeting at West End Methodist 
Chapel is still in progress, with much in- 
terest. There have been many inquirers 
and seekers of salvation and ten or more 
have been converted. — Statesville Christian 
Herald. 

Pastor Falls, assisted by Rev. Wilbur 
LeGette, of Acton, N. C, will begin a se- 
ries of meetings at the Methodist church 
in Brevard next Sunday evening. Every- 
body is cordially invited to attend these 
services and especially all Christians are 
asked to pray for and assist in every way 
possible to make these meetings a blessing 
to our town and community. — Sylvan Val- 
ley News, Brevard. 

The meeting at Connestee, mentioned 
elsewhere in this issue, has closed. Rev. 
Geo. F. Kirby, of the Swannanoa circuit, 
was with us and preached nine excellent 
serrnons. To say that we were delighted 
with Bro. K's work is putting it mildly. 
Being a young man of studious habits and 
great zeal, coupled with the fact that he 



T II E EPWOR T II N E W S 



< 



is deeply pious, assures us that he has a 
bright future before him. The meeting 
was a good one, and we are led to believe 
that many souls were liberated from the 
slavish chains of sin, a number of back- 
sliders reclaimed and Christians now firm- 
ly established in the faith. — Monthly Vis- 
itor. 

A protracted meeting was commenced at 
the Methodist church last Wednesdai" 
night by the pastor. Rev. J. T. Stover, as- 
sisted by Rev. R. D. Sherrill of Waynes- 
ville. 

'Mr. Sherrill is an eloquent and forcible 
preacher, and his sermons have made a 
deep and lasting impression on a great 
many of his hearers, and he will doubtless 
achieve great success in his noble work of 
saving souls. His sermon Sunday morning 
was a splendid effort, and commanded the 
earnest attention of the large congregation 
present. The services will continue this 
week and probably into the next. — An- 
drews Sun. 



A Trip to Nashville. 

Editorial Correspondence. 

Since the last issue of this paper it has 
been our privilege to attend the Tennessee 
Centennial exposition at Nashville. We 
■left on Monday night, September 20th, with 
the North Carolina Press Association. On 
board we found Mr. and Mrs, Dowd of 
Charlotte, Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Ivey of 
Greensboro, Mr. Barrier and son of Con- 
cord, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert of Kinston, 
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy of Hickory, Prof. P. 
P. Claxton of Greensboro, Mr. Varner of 
Lexington, Misses Lawrence and Dills, two 
charming representatives of the tripod 
from Oxford and Kinston respectively, and 
others. 

Mr. J. B. Sherrill, our genial secretary, 
had preceded the association some weeks 
and made arrangements for a stop-over at 
Chattanooga. This side trip was very much 
-enjoyed by those who took advantage of 
it. After breakfasting at the Stanton House 
a drive was arranged through the Chick- 
amauga National park. We proceeded with 
a conveyance that held the whole party, 
drawn by four swift Tennessee steeds. 
The ribbons were entrusted to a dark rep- 
resentative of Africa, who had evidently 
swallowed a history of the late war. There 
seemed to be nothing connected with any 
scrimmage that occurred around Chattanoo- 
ga with which he was not familiar. He 
would gravely inform us of the intentions 
of General Bragg, and then insist that 
"he didn't did it" or that he "done it." 
It was indeed amusing, it not instructive, 
to listen to his harangues. No one should 
think of visiting this part of Tennessee 
without going through the 'Chickamauga 
National park. The government has al- 
ready expended almost two million dollars 
there. It impartially marks with monu- 
ments and tablets the positions of leading 
officers and regiments in both the Federal 
and Confederate armies. After a dusty 
35 mile drive through the park, we re- 
turned to the foot of Lookout Mountain, 



taking the incline railway to Lookout Inn. 
After lunch the afternon was spent in tak- 
ing advantage of the wonderful views to be 
obtained from this bewildering height. 
Lookout Mountain is 2,400 feet above the 
■level of the sea and 1,600 feet above the 
Tennessee river, which flows in the fore- 
ground. This river is 1,700 feet wide, but 
from this elevation it seems to be a mere 
creek. A great many extensive travelers 
have declared that this is the finest view 
in America, and some have gone so far as 
to say it cannot be surpassed in the whole 
world. We had the pleasure of witnessing 
a magnificent sunset from the summit of 
Lookout, but as Prof. Claxton promised to 
"write it up" in the "Journal of Educa- 
tion," Mr. Barrier in the "Standard," and 
Miss Lawrence in the "Orphan's Friend," 
we are quite sure the North Carolina news- 
paper readers will be sufficiently afflicted! 

Leaving Chattanooga about midnight, we 
arrived inNashville early Wednesday morn- 
ing. We were announced to stop at the 
Price College hotel and some of us did re- 
main there to the end of our visit. Others 
did not. The accomodations were very 
poor, and no one could be blamed for hur- 
rying away. 

So much has been said through the pa- 
pers about the exposition that it is not our 
intention to give a minute description of 
the buildings and exhibits. It was our 
good fortune to attend both the Chicago 
and Atlanta expositions, and we have no 
hesitancy in saying that the one at Nash- 
ville is as creditable as either of the oth- 
ers according to its pretentions. In a 
great many respects the arrangement is 
more pleasing than that at Atlanta. The 
grounds are laid out beautifully, and the 
grass and foliage must have been delight- 
ful to the eye before the pitiless drought 
set in a month ago. The prettiest build- 
ing on the ground is the Parthenon, which 
is the art gallery. "In design, in freize and 
in tablature it is a perfect reproduction of 
the original. It is the one instance in the 
history of exposition buildings in this coun- 
try where color has been used. The band 
of bright blue is a most pleasing feature. 
The figures in the freize and in tablature 
are noble indeed, in the sunshine or under 
the glow of the electric light." The other 
main buildings are the Government, Agri- 
cultural, Woman's Machinery. Auditorium 
and the Negro building. The Southern rail- 
way has a specially attractive exhibit in 
its enormous passenger locomotive. It is 
one of the three largest in the world. 

Of course the exposition would not be 
complete without a "Midway." At Nash- 
ville it is called "Vanity Fair." A few of 
the attractions, perhaps, are worth the ad- 
mission fee asked, but the great majority 
are "fakes." 

Of course we could not think of visit- 
ing Nashville without taking a look at our 
publishing house. We were glad of the 
opportunity thus afforded. We may as 
well admit that we were amazed at the 
size of the building and the volume of 
work carried on. We were fortunate in 
finding Dr. James Atkins in his office, who 
had just returned from a Kentucky confer- 



ence. He introduced us to Bro. Parks, Dr. 
Steele's assistant, who spent two hours 
showing us over the house from cellar to 
garret. Bro. Parks is an affable, genial fel- 
low and we have no doubt is the right man 
in the right place. We were pleased also 
to meet Dr. Boswell, the assistant editor 
of the Advocate. He was busy in his den, 
grinding out matter for the next issue. 
But as our space is filled we must quit. 
We hope to have more to say about our 
publishing house in a future issue. 

G. L. H. 



Nashville Exposition. 

With the approach of cool weather and 
the closing days of the Nashville Exposi- 
tion, interest in that occasion steadily in- 
creases, and the movement to Nashville is 
very encouraging. 

The Southern Railway is the short and 
direct route to Nashville. 'Double daily 
service with through Pullman cars. 

Norfolk and Nashville Limited, leaving 
Norfolk daily 9:20 a. m., leaving Raleigh 
3:40 p. m., leaving Greensboro 6:45 p. m., 
arriving Nashville 1:50 p. m. the following 
clay. Through Pullman drawing room car 
Norfolk to Nashville. 

Washington and Southwestern Limited, 
daily, with through Pullman car from Jer- 
sey City, Washington and Greensboro to 
Nashville, connection from Goldsboro, 
Raleigh and all points in North Carolina. 

Call on agent or representative of the 
Southern Railway for full information. 



Local Dots. 

The protracted service at Central 
Church, which closed a week ago. was 
not attended by immediate results, but 
the pastor reports evidences of a wide- 
spread religious interest in the congre- 
gation. 

The Coucert given by the faculty of 
the Asheville College for Women, was of 
the highest type. Seldom has Asheville 
people enjoyed such a treat. 

The series of meetings in progress at 
Bethel Church promise to be interesting 
and profitable. 

Dr. LeGette, pastor of Sulphur Springs 
circuit, has been holding services at 
Balm Grove during (he past week. 

Miss Bing, the vocal teacher at the 
College, sang for Central congregation 
on Sunday morning, and the audience 
was charmed with her sweet, unaffected 
manner, as well as with her superb 
voice. 



Revival at Franklin. 

The revival meetings at the Methodist 
church continue with increasing inter- 
est. Rev. Frank Siler is preaching 
twice daily. Conversions at nearly 
every service. Some twenty or more 
have already professed. Last Sunday 
was a great day. There were four ser- 
vices and a crowded house at each hour 
— Franklin Press. 



8 



T H E E P W R T II N E W S 



THE 






EDITED BY REV. GEO. F. KIRBY, A. M. 






TOPIC FOR OCTOBER— ST. PAUL'S 

DOCTRINE OF THE HOLY 

SPIRIT. 

Oct. 3—" Conviction for Sin." 

Rom. Tiii, 26, 2": ix,.l. 2; I Cor. ii. 10, 12. 

I see no direct reference to sin or to con- 
viction for sin in our assigned texts. How- 
ever, St. Paul was fully conscious of the 
fact that sin reigned in the hearts of the 
unregenerate, and that as long as there 
was no enlightruent, there could be no real 
conviction for sin. Christ came into the 
world to enlighten the world and to save 
it from the condemnation and guilt of sin. 
But we will not seek salvation from sin 
until we become conscious of the fact that 
"the soul that sinneth it shall die." Now 
then, just as "the Spirit itself foeareth wit- 
ness with our spirits that we are the chil- 
dren of God, even so does the same spirit 
testify to us concerning our utter lost 
condition— convicts us of sin. The greatest 
blessing that can be bestowed upon a sin- 
ner is a real deep conviction for sin; not 
that kind that makes us just a little sorry, 
but that that makes us hate our own sin- 
ful selves, that that sends humbly to the 
feet of Jestts, for never yet .has an earnest 
see-ker after God failed 'to find him. 

To he deeply convicted for sin is to be 
alarmed at our condition. Such will bring 
repentance, and repentance is the forrun- 
ner of salvation. Repentance for sin 
means a forsaking of sin: Else there is no 
repentance. The Spirit of God or the Holy 
Ghost, operating upon the conscience of a 
sinner and enlightening him, brings about 
conviction, repentance and salvation. 

Now, that same Spirit that works upon 
us to repentance, 'that shows us our sin. 
and at the same time our own inability to 
save ourselves from sin, aids us in our 
feeble approaches towards God. Rom. 
VIII, 26: Likewise the spirit also helpeth 
our infirmaries; for we know not -what we 
should pray for as we ought, but the spirit 
itself maketh intercession for us, with 
groanings which cannot be uttered. Near- 
sighted, human creatures, especially those 
who know not God as yet. whose under- 
standings and desires are weak, know not 
how to pray, nor for what to pray. Here 
the spirit, St. Paul tells us. comes in, in 
the earnestness even of groanings, and 
helps us, frames our thoughts and our 
desires, though our tongues may utter out- 
own words. 

We are told too that this intercession is 
according to the will of God (verse 27). 
Notwithstanding we cannot utter the de- 
sires that are prompted by the Spirit, yet 
God. who searcheth the hearts upon which 
the Spirit is operating, knows the mind of 
the Spirit. But this intercession is for 
the saints, or those groaning so to be. 
Such as put themselves under the influence 



of the Sp : rit and are willing to be guided 
by HLm may be termed saints, and for 
such the Spirit intercedes. 

The Spirit truly aids us in all our ef- 
forts to find God. He it is who helps us 
in all of our experiences, and prompts us 
to deeds. Paul, in Rom. IX, 2, was not 
sorrowful because of sin in himself; but 
the great heaviness and continual sorrow 
was because of the unbelief of his kins- 
men according to the flesh. -Hence, we 
learn that the Spirit not only awakens us 
to a sense of our lost condition and inter- 
ests us in that, but it also awakens us 
and interests us in others who are lost, 
even in those who are not ur breatbren in 
the flesh. 

Every truly awakened Christian has 
great heaviness and sorrow for the lost 
condition of his hretbren and will seek to 
save them. 



Oct. io— " The Miracle of Regenera= 
tion." 

I Cor. vi, 11; Gal. Ill, 14; v, 3. 

Indeed it was a miracle, just as much 
as was the creation of man. It is the crea- 
tion of a new heart. But before we 
proceed further let us find out what is 
meant by "Regen ration." For this pur- 
pose let us turn to Watson : 

"REGENERATION, a new -birth; that 
work of the Holy Spirit -by which we ex- 
perience a change of heart. The change 
in regeneration consits in the recovery of 
the moral image of God upon the heart, 
that is to say, so as to love him supremely 
and serve him ultimately as our highest 
end, an to delight in him superlatively 
as our chief good." It is not the same as 
justification, although it is connected with 
it. 

'Justification is an act of God, not in 
or upon man, but for him, and in his fa- 
vor." "It respects man only as its ob- 
ject, and translates him into another rela- 
tive state." It is the pardon for all past 
sins. So far as God is concerned, the jus- 
tified is as though he had never com- 
mitted -sin in as much as God treasurs 
themnot up againsthim. Regeneration is the 
work done in a man, the destroying of the 
old nature and the creation of the new. 
This is variously expressed in the scrip- 
tures as — the new -birth, the 'putting off 
of the old man, the putting on of the new 
man. the partaking of the Divine nature. 
All of these express a change of nature, 
of sentiment and feeling towards God. 

The regenerate man now loves what once 
he hated, and hates what once he loved. 
He now has his affections centered upon 
the things of God. Now he seeks to please 
God by works of righteousness, as well as 
by paying homage unto him. 

But how justified and regenerated?. Our 
last two references settle that question. By 
faith. "It is all effected by the word of 
truth, or the gospel of salvation gaining 
an entrance into the mind, through divine 
teaching, so as to possess the understand- 
ing, subdue the -will, and reign in the af- 
fections. In a word, it is faith -working 
by love that constitutes the new creature, 
the regenerate man." 



This embraces the whole plan of salva- 
tion. Jesus came to pay the debt we owe 
to God. He suffered that we might live. 
He made the atonement. When we for- 
sake sin, and lay it down at the feet of 
Jesus, when we believe on him who justi- 
fi-eth the ungodly, we stand justified in 
God's sight 'He that exerciseth a living 
faith in the Son of God hath everlasting 
life. And again: "By grace are ye saved 
through faith." 

In all this the Spirit plays His part. 
After working upon us to conviction and 
repentance, and aiding us in exercising a 
living faith in Christ, He beareth witness 
with our spirit that we are the childern of 
God. 

A great many references may be found 
on this subject. 'Here are a few: John 
III, 7; Eph. II, 1; Gai. IV, lit; Peter I, 4; 
John I, 12-13; III, 4; Eph. II. 8-10; James 
I, 18; I Peter, I, 23; I Cor. IV, 13: Gal. 
V, 6. 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY, 

In Effect June 20. 1897. 



NO. 15. 


(Central Time.) 




NO. 16. 


9:25 am Lv. 


.... Norfolk 


Ar 


5:25 pm 


9:45 am Lv. 


. Pinners Point . 


.Ar. 


5:05 pm 


2:30 pm Ar. 


Selma 


Lv 


12:50 pm 


2:35 pm Lv. 


Selma 


. Ar 


12:45 pm 


3:40 pm Lv. 


Raleigh ... 


.Lv 11:45 am 


4:38 pm Lv. 


. . . , Durham . . . . 


.Lv 10:52 am 


6:45 pm Ar. 


. .Greensboro .. 


.Lv 


8:50 am 


6:55 pm Lv. 


. . Greensboro . . 


.Ar 


8:25 am 


7:12 pm Lv. 


. .High Point .. 


.Ar 


8:20 am 


8:15 pm Ar 


Salisbury (E time) 


Lv 


7:10 am 


7:55 pm Lv 


Salisbury (C time) 


Ar 


6:00 am 


8:18 pm Lv. 


... Cleveland ... 


.Lv 


5:38 am 


8:40 pm Lv. 


.. .Statesville ... 


.Lv 


5:16 am 


9:15 pm Lv. 


Newton . . . 


.Lv 


4:39 am 


9:30 pm Lv. 


Hickory 


Lv 


4:23 am 


9:46 pm Lv 


Connelly Springs 


Lv 


4:06 am 


10:02 pm Lv. 


. . . Morganton . . . 


.Lv 


3:49 am 


10:35 pm Lv. 


Marion 


.TiV 


3:15 am 


10:53 pm Lv. 


... Old Fort ... 


.Lv 


2 : 55 am 


12:04 am Lv. 




,T,v 


1 : 51 am 


12:12 am Ar. 


... Asheville ... 


.Lv 


1:44 am 


12:17 am Ar. 


... Asheville ... 


.Ar 


1:39 am 


1:29 am Ar. 


.. Hot Springs .. 


.Lv 12:23 am 


3:00 am Ar. 


. . Morristown . . 


. Lv 10:55 pm 


4:00 am Ar. 


. . . Knoxville . . . 


.Lv 


9 : 50 pm 


4:05 am Lv. 


. . . Knoxville . . . 


.Ar 


9:55 pm 


6:39 am Lv. 


. . . Cleveland . . . 


.Lv 


7:19 pm 


7:40 am Ar. 


, . Chattanooga . . 


.Lv 


6:20 pm 


1:35 pm Ar. 


. . . Nashville . . . 


.Lv 12:25 pm 


EASTBOUND. No. 6. 


No. 12. 



Lv Chattanooga 8:30 am 4:05 am 

Lv Knoxville 12:05 pm 8:25 am 

Lv Morristown 1:25 pm 9:50 am 

Lv Hot Springs 3:15 pm 11:46 am 

Ar Asheville 4:35 pm 1:15 pm 

No. 38. 

Lv Asheville 1:25 pm 

Lv Biltmore 1:36 pm 

Lv Round Knob 2:35 pm 

Lv Marion 3.32pm 

Lv Morganton 4.11pm 

Ar Hickory 4.50pm 

Ar Newton 5.08pm 

Ar Statesville 5.48pm 

Ar Salisbury 6.40pm 

(Eastern Time.) 

Lv Salisbury 9.36pm 8.15pm 

Lv Greensboro 10.44pm 9.52pm 

Ar Danville 12.00 m 11.25pm 

Ar Lynchburg 1.58am 

Ar Charlottesville 3.35am 

Ar Washington 6.42am 

Ar Baltimore 8.00am 

Ar Philadelphia 10.15am j 



T II E E T W R T II X E W S 



Ar New York 12.43pm 

Ar Richmond 6.00am 

Ar Durham . , 5.30am 

Ar Raleigh • 7.10am 

Ar Goldsboro 1.10pm 

WESTBOUND 11 $7 

Lv Goldsboro 4.45pm 

Lv Raleigh 2.00am 

Lv Durham 3.30am 

Lv Richmond 2.00am 

Lv New York 4.30p'm 

Lv Philadelphia 6.50pm 

Lv Baltimore 9.20pm 

Lv Washingon 10.43pm 

Lv Charlottesville .. .. 1.65am 

Lv Lynchburg 3.45am 

Lv Danville 6.05am 5.50am 

Lv Greensboro 7.32am 7.05am 

Ar Salisbury 9.37am 1.17am 

(Central Time.) 

Lv Salisbury 8.55am 

Ar Statesville 9.46am 

Ar Newton 10.26am 

Lv Hickory 10.47am 

Ar Morgan ton 11.28am 

Ar Marion 12.12pm 

Ar Round Knob 12.50pm 

Ar Biltmore 2,15pm 

Ar Asheville 2.25 pm No. 5. 

Lv Asheville 2.30 pm 6.15 am 

Lv Hot Springs 3.52 pm 7.39 am 

Lv Morris town 5.55 pm 9.30 am 

Ar Knoxville 7.40 pm 11.00 am 

Ar Chattanooga 11.35 pm 7.40 pm 

Ar Nashville 6.45 am S.45 am 



A. & S. ROAD. 10. 14. .8 

Lv Asheville . . . 2.05 pm 7.20 am 8.00 pm 

(Eastern Time.) 

Lv Asheville 3.05 pm 8.20 am 9.00 pm 

Lv Biltmore 3.15 pm 8.28 am 9.10 pm 

Lv Hen'sonv'l . . 4.00 pm 9.18 am 9.58 pm 

Lv Tryon 5.00 pm 10.20 am 11.02 pm 

Lv Spartanburg.. 6.0Spm 11.28 am 12.10 am 

Ar Union 7.15 pm 12.45 pm 

Lv Union 7.30 pm 1.05 pm 

Lv Alston 8.53 pm 2.45 pm 

Ar Columbia 9.38 pm 3.35 pm 

(Central Time.) 

Ar. Savannah 5:00 am. 

Ar. Jacksonville ... 9:10 am. 

9. 13 1 

Lv. Jacksonville . 7:00 pm. 
Lv. Savannah 11:36 pm. 

(Eastern Time.) 
Lv Columbia ... 8.30am 11.30am 

Lv Alston 9.07 am 12.15 am 

Ar Union 10.20 am 1.42 pm 

Lv Union 2.02 pm 

Lv Spartanburg 11.45 pm 3.33 pm 5.46 am 

Lv Tryon 12.42 pm 6.00 pm 7.42 am 

Lv Hend'sonvl .. 1.45 pm 6.05 pm 8.45 am 

Lv Biltmore 2.35 pm 6.52 pm 9.35 am 

Ar Asheville .... 2.45 pm 7.00 pm 9.45 am 

(Central Time.) 
Ar Asheville .... 1.45pm 6.00pm 8.45am 
MURPHY BRANCH. 17 Mixed. 17 



Except Sunday. 

Lv. Asheville 4:40 pm. 9:00 am. 

Lv. Waynesville .. 6:05 pm. 11:30 am. 

Ar. Balsam 6:30 pm. 12:15 am. 

Ar. Bryson City 8:40 pm. 3:30 pm. 

Ar. Andrews 6:45 pm. 

Ar. Tomotla 7:37 pm. 

Ar. Murphy 8:00 pm. 

18 Mixed. 66 

Lv. Murphy 4:30 am. 

Lv. Tomotla 4:50 am. 

Ar. Andrews 6:20 am. 

Lv. Bryson City.... 8:40 am. 

Lv. Balsam 8:20 am. 11:30 pm. 

Lv. Balsam 10:05 am. 12:35 pm. 

Lv. Waynesville ... 10:30 am. 1:15 pm. 

Ar. Asheville 12:01 pm. 3:35 pm. 



MIXED TRAINS. 



NO. 64 NO. 65 

(Central Time.) 

Lv. Asheville 9:15pm. Ar. Asheville 1:15am. 

(Eastern Time.) 
Ar. Spart'b'g 5:30 am Lv. Sparfb'g 7:30 pm. 



NO. 62 NO. 6» 


Lv. 

Ar. 


(Central Time.) 
Asheville 6:30am. Ar. Asheville 7:15pm. 
Salisbury 7:30pm. Lv. Salisbury 5:30am. 


NO. 66 NO. 65 


Ar. 
Lv. 


Asheville 6:35pm Ar. Morrist'n 11:30pm 
Morrist'n 9:39am. Lv. Asheville 5:00am. 



Tranis Not. 11 and 12. and 37 and 38, 
Pullman Sleeping cars between Nashville, 
Chattanooga, Knoxville. Hot Springs, 
Asheville, Washington and Jersey City. 

Trains Nos. 37, 11 and 12 Pullman Sleep- 
ing car, between Augusta and Charlotte. 

Trains Nos 11 and 12, 9 and 10 Pullman 
Sleepers, between Cincinnati, Asheville. 
Columbia, Savannah and Jacksonville. 

Trains 15 and 16, Pullman Sleeping ear 
between Norfolk, Raleigh, Greensboro, 
Salisbury, Asheville, Knoxville, Chatta- 
nooga and Nashville. 

J. M. CULP. Traffic Manager, Washing- 
ton. 
W. A. TURK S. H. HARDWICK, 

Gen'l Pass. Agt., Asst. Gen'IPass. Agt. 
Washington, D. C. Atlanta, Ga 

C. A. BENSCOTER, Assistant General Pas 

senger Agent, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
V. R. DARBY. C. P. &T. A.. Abbeville. N O 



An Evening with Longfellow. 

The Epworth League met at the home of 
Rev. C. F. Sherrill last Monday evening, 
and a most enjoyable evening it was. A 
large number of young and married people 
were present, and all seemed to enjoy the 
occasion. The program was an "evening 
with Longfellow." Miss Sallie MeGehee 
read a biographical sketch of this favorite 
American author, and then selections were 
read from many of his choice poems. Miss 
Eugenia Wall read selections from the 
Courtship of Miles Standish. Miss Lillian 
Martin recited the Building of the Ship, 
and Mr. Bennie Wall read the Village 
Blacksmith. Rev. Howard Rondthaler was 
present, and made a pleasant impromptu 



speech on the life of Longfellow, and 
spoke words of encouragement to the mem- 
bers of the League. These exercises would 
have done credit to many school exhibi- 
tions. The young people much enjoy the 
League. It gives them a pleasant and 
profitable evening. The religious and the 
literary and the social features are admi ■ 
rably joined. The League is growing and 
never was more popular with the young 
than at present. — North Carolina Advo- 
cate. 



ffearaiille College 

Weaverville. N. C. 

An elegant new building containing 
seven rooms has been added, and the old 
building has been remodeled with a new 
Iront. There are fifteen acres of land, 
which, when improved, will afford am- 
ple and beautiful grounds for the cam- 
pus. 

The location of Weaverville is one of 
the finest in the South, high elevasion, 
pure water, health record unequaled, a 
community of moral and religious citi-_ 
zens. No Saloons. 

A telephone line connects Weaverville 
with Asheville. 

Weaverville offers full courses in Sci- 
ence, Mathematics, Ancient and Modern 
Languages, English Literature, History, 
Music and Art. 

Expenses for a year range from #ioo 
to $125. 

The next session opens Sept. 8, 1S97. 

For full information, semi for cata- 
logue. 

M. A. YOST, President. 

J. E. RHEIM, Secretary. 



35 Volumes 7,500 Illustrations 28,600 Pages 

Completeand Upjo Date ^ja^™ <£*££?%?££?% 

Latest Maps— Includes an Unabridged Dictionary— Information Right Down to Date— You can 
keep up to the times by adding an annual each year. V No other Cyclopedia even pretends to 
claim these features, but don't you think they are pretty important? Send us your name and let 
us show you In detail the various points of superiority possessed by The Columbian. It covers 
the whole range of knowledge; is prepared by the most able and experienced editors and cyclo- 
pedia writers, and is commended by the best judges throughout the country. 

The BeSt Family Library Because it is clear and simple in language, free from tech- 

_j — j nicalities, non-partisan and non-sectarian, and above all 

Neither "British" nor Sectional, but THOROUGHLY AMERICAN. A work of refer 
ence which is foreign or narrowly sectional has no place in an American home. Sold on easy- 



terms of payment. 



GARRETSON, COX & CO., Publishers, Buffalo. N. Y. 



For full descriptive circulars and terms send to our Southern Agents, 

THE COLUMBIAN BOOK CO., 81 Whitehall Street. Atlanta, Georgia 



10 



T II E E P W O R T II X E W S 



The Normal and 
Collegiate Institute. 



For Young Women, 



ASIIEVIIvLE, N. C. 



FALL TERM beginning Sept. 23, 1S97. 
Offers to the student: 

I. A Normal course for the thorough train- 
ing: of teachers under instructors from the best 
Normal schools, embracing careful instruction 
in the most improved methods of teaching, with 
practice in the model school. 

II. A fully organized Commercial course for 
the preparation of young women for office work 
embracing Stenography Typewriting, Book- 
keeping (single and double entry ■, Penmanship, 
Commercial Arithmetic and Correspondence. 

III. A course in Domestic Science, [a] in 
which the pupil is taught to draught, cut, fit, 
make garments and millinery; [b] to prepare a 
meal which shall be healthful, economic and 
appetizing. The teachers in these departments 
are from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Systematic study of the Bible in all depart- 
ments. 

A specialty is made of Health Culture under 
one of the best teachers in the South. 

By special enactment of the legislature of 
North Carolina, graduates from the Normal 
Department are exempted from examination 
when applying for positions in the public 
schools of the state. 

Cost of board and tuition in any of the depart- 
ments $50 per term, or $100 for the school year. 
No extras except music. 
For catalogue address 

Rev. Thos. Lawrence, D. D., 

Asheville, N. C. 



Frank B. Miller 

INTERIOR 
DECORATOR 

Fine Wall Paper, 
Water and Oil Colors. 

Odd Fellows Building, 
l(i Church Street. 

Asheville, N. C. 
Phone 292. 

DEALER IN 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Wall 

Papers, Lincrusta - Walton 
Fresco and Relief Work. 



In Whom to Trust. 
When the mists of pain are thickest 

And the storm is at its height, 
When bewildered and affrighted, 

We stumble without light; 
When the old props faint and fail us, 

And the old hopes fade and flee, 
O Lord! most kind, most pitiful, 

Whom have we left but thee? 

When youth and beauty in their prime 

Are withered at a breath, 
When the very light of life is quenched 

Bv the chill hand of death; 
When the leafage we call happiness 

It stripped off utterly, 
O Lord! the Lord who changes not, 

Whom may we trust save thee? 

What can we do but lighten 

Our half-despairing hold 
Upon thy sure and steadfast word, 

TI13' seamless garment's fold? 
Anchor of drifting, struggling hearts, 

Sore vexed by wind or sea, 
O Lord! the everlasting Lord, 

Our only hope is thee! 

Thro' blackest night, 'mid wildest wave, 

In heights and depths unknown, 
We sta3 7 us on that faithfulness 

Which never failed its own. 
Beaten and blown and buffeted. 

And long the way may he, 
But blessed the way, O pit3'ing Lord! 

If it but ends in thee. 

— Susan Coolide, in S. S. Times. 



Rules for Church Going. 

In the porch of the little parish church 
in England where" Mr. Gladstone worships 
when he is at Hawardeu Castle, there is 
posted a notice containing counsels to 
church worshippers which is worthy of be- 
ing inscribed in the gateway of every Chris 
tian church. The following is a transcript: 
ON YOUR WAY TO CHURCH. 

On yon way to the Lord's house, be 
thoughtful, be silent, or say but little, and- 
that little good. Speak not of other men's 
faults; think of your own, for you are go- 
ing to ask forgiveness. Never stay out- 
side: go in at once; time spent inside 
should be precious. "> 

IN CHURCH. 

Kneel down very humbly and pray. 
Spend the time that remains in prayers; 
remember the awful presence into which 
you have corne. Do not look about to see 
who are coming in, nor for any other 
cause. It matters nothing to you what 
others are doing; attend to yourself. Fast- 
en your thoughts firmly on the holy ser- 
vice; do not miss one word. This needs a 
severe struggle; you have no time for" vain 
thoughts. The blessed Spirit will preserve 
if you preserve. 

_- AFTER CHURCH. 

Remain kneeling and pray. Be intent: 
speak to no one until you are outside. 
The church is God's house even when 
prayer is over. tBe quiet and thoughtful 
as vou go through the church-vard. 
ON YOUR WAY" HOME. 

Be careful of your talk, or the world 
will soon slip back into your heart. Re- 
member where you have been, and what 
you have done. Resolve and live to lead a 
better life. — Selected. 



If you need a 




we can suit you. 



If your Epworth League, Sunda}-- 
school or Church contemplates buying 
either a 



iano or Organ 



it will be to your interest to write us. 
We sell for cash or on installment. 



Hough & Dunham, 

it Church St., Asheville, N. C. 



School Shoes 



will soon he needed. In 
Misses Spring Heels we 
have widths to fit any 
foot, medium and heavy 
weight. 



- Boys' Shoes, the good 
wearing sort to stand the 
usage a boy's shop gets. 
Only solid itmer and out- 
er soles used that stand 
rain and wet as well as 
dry weather. 



We've made a specialty 
of Shoes for many years. 
Goods exchanged or your 
money back if not suited 
at 



SPANGENBERG'S 



4 North Court Square. 



THE EP WORTH NEWS 



11 



Perfection. 

I was reading to-day the third chapter 
of the Epistle to the Philippians, and 
my attention was arrested by the appar- 
ent contradiction between verses 12-15. 
In the former Paul says that he was not 
already perfect, but in the latter he 
writes: "Let us therefore, as man)' as be 
perfect." He seems to teach that not 
only he, but many of those whom he ad- 
dressed, were perfect, although he had 
just declared that he was not, but was 
pressing toward the mark. How shall 
we reconcile these two statements ? 
While thinking about it I looked out of 
the window, and saw a tree full of fruit. 
It was not very large, but it was sym- 
metrical; it was evidently healthy, too, 
for the foliage was green, and the 
peaches were large and abundant. I 
said to myself: "This is a perfect peach 
tree. Anybody who saw it would say so. 
It is just what a tree six years old ought 
to be. But just because it is perfect it 
will grow large, it will have more 
branches and foliage and fruit year by 
year. All perfection, save that of God 
himself, is relative." 

We read in the Bible about "the spir- 
its of just men made perfect." Have 
they become fossils, or are they still liv- 
ing and learning and growing? 

We think of the angels in heaven 
as hoU' and perfect. But are they — like 
a picture or piece of statuary — finished 
for all time? No! they are increasing 
in knowledge, and, therefore, in charac- 
ter and in blessedness. The angelic na- 
ture, which was perfect when they were 
created, has been expanding and devel- 
oping age after age. Whatever lives 
must grow. Paul writes to the Corrin- 
thians that even in this life we are 
changed from glory to glory. Can we 
believe that this blessed law of progress 
will end when we die? Will it not, on I 
the contrary, operate with greater ener- 
gy in the higher sphere, so that the God- 
ward progress will be far more rapid 
there than here? 

Paul's idea in the fifteenth verse evi- 
dently is that of an all round, complete 
consecration to Christ. We become per- 
fect in our self-surrender when we be- 
come christians. We accept a new heart 
and a new life. We are complete in him, 
but it is as "babes in Christ." Then, 
leaving these first principles, we are to 
go on to perfection — that is, to the full 
and complete development of the life 
that is "hid with Christ in God." A lit- 
tle study of the law of life and growth, 
a ' revealed even in inanimate nature, 
would save people from many erroneous 
ideas of perfection. — Journal and Mes- 
senger. 



Life is Sweet! 



This has been a saying used by man 
for many generations, but it has not 
been used by things that can't talk until 
the collars spoke to the cuffs at the 
Asheville Steam Laundry after using 
their famous Domestic Finish. The 
remark was called forth by the experi- 
ence of the collars and cuffs that they 
lived so much longer under the new 
system, than with the gloss finish. Cus- 
tomers can have either, but we advise 
the Domestic. 



ASHEVILLE STERSV! LAUNDRY 

J. A. NICHOLS, Proprietor, . 
43 West College st. ASHKVmB, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

AND 

COLPORTAGE AGENCY. 

I solicit orders from all cur 
Sunday Schools and Churches for 
all supplies of Hymn and Song 
Books, Sunday School Literature, 
Libraries, Bibles, Record Books, 
etc., etc. 

I can supply the Holman Self 
Pronouncing, the International, 
the Oxford and othtsr Teachers' 
Bibles as low and often lower than 
you will find them elsewhere. 
Also family and smaller hand and 
pocket Bibles and Testaments. 
The life of Dr. Chas. F. Deems at 
$1.50 just out. The Young Peoples 
new Sunday School song books, 
note addition at ,$3.60 per dozen, 
post paid, either round or shaped 
note. Word addition $1.25 per 
dozen, post paid. 

Any proper book furnished, no 
matter where published. 

N.R.RICHARDSON, 

High Point, N. £L_ 
Colportage Agent of the W. N. C. 
Conference of the M. E. Church, 
South. 




Subscribe for the Epworth Nkws. 



A Great Harvest for Agents. 

Holiday Sales Over 25,000 in One Month. 

Those new Books are selling- fastes' 
and doing - more good than any other 
religions books on the market. The 
Children's Edition has 138 pages, 
fully illustrated with 43 large new 
cuts, size 6x8 inches. Price in heavy 
board covers, 35 cts. Cloth, GO cts. 
Large Edition, cloth, 330 pages, 
price, 81.00. AGENTS MAKING 

FROM §20.00 TO S30.00 PER WEEK. 






E B 

A little sir., 13 years old, made $7.50 in one day. A crippled boy made $40.00 In two 
weeks. A man made $12.50 in one day. Another ^31-00 in one week. Another £40 00 in 
eight days. Another made $12700 in fifteen days, una other agents have had equal 
success. It makes little difference whether you have had experience as an agent or 
not. Fairly presented, these books will sell themselves. Everybody will 
want them. 

From the multitudes of testimonials we quote just a few: 

Central Congregatlonalist: "Many of the incidents are exceedingly pathetic, and 
can scarcely fail to stir any tender heart to tears. 

The Union Signal, organ of the W, O. T. U.: "This book is neither doctrinal not 
denominational, yet distinctly Christian. Its high religious tone. Its fascinating spirit 
and the high rank of its contributors make It a strong faith tonic and an inspiration tc 
prevailing prayer." 

Michigan Christian Advocate: "The larger issue of this work has been widely elr 
culated and read. This cheaper edition (illustratrd) contains such selections as are ca! 
cuiatod to interest and Instruct children. The Incidents are very pathetic." 

Write at once for terms to Aeents. Be early in the Held. A copy of cm; 
hook is all the outfit needed. These will be sent, postpaid, on receipt 01 price, and In, 
of this amount will be credited to your account as soon as you order half a dozen ■ 
more books. Write at once to 

S. B. SHAW, Publisher, 25 Canal St.', Grand Rapids, Micl 

Ui?" We ship books from Cincinnati. Ohio. Mention tills paper when you write- 
Syeclal Inducements to Sunday Schools that want books. 



THE EP WORTH NEWS 




acket 
Store 
News 



30 South Main St. 
SSHEVILLE, N. C. 



It is impossible to make people see everything just as you see it, 
but I am convinced that my customers see my bargains as I do. 

Trade growing every day, proving to me that my buying and my 
selling is fully appreciated. 

You should carefully examine our two last purchases in sample 
Shoes and sample Hats. There are so many kinds, styles, and prices 
we cannot intelligently price them and convey any idea as to what 
you get, except I will say honestly, you get a $2 shoe at $1.50; a fl 
shoe at 75c. Same in hats. We have arangements for three large 
lines of sample shoes in October and November. Come and see us. 

J. M. STON1R. 



BEAT VALUE 



In a number of differ- 
ent Seasonable things 
while the early pur- 
chases last. 

Man}' of these are now quoted to us 
more than ten per cent, higher than the 
figures at which we invested. 

II. REDWOOD & CO. 

Clothing, Dry Goods, Shoes, Hats. 
BUTTERICK PATTER NS 

7 and 9 Patton Avenue. 




IB. H. COSBY 

Jeweler. 



Souvenirs, North Carolina Gems. 



Eastman's Pocket Kodaks 

and Bull's Eye Kodaks 

• ■ 

and Supplies. 



No. 27 PATTON AVENUE, 



ESTREICHER & COMPANY, 

28 SOUTH MAIN STREET. 

The orders for our Fall Silks were placed by us before the change 
in prices took effect. They cannot be duplicated at wholesale for 
less than we offer them to you. 

BUT WE HAVE THEIVI FOR RETAIL-NOT FOR SPECULATION. 

Every tiling des : rable from the brightest novelties to the sedate effects are shown here. 

TAFFETAS, in plain and changeable. Taffetas, latest Scotch Plaids and Roman Stripes. 

FANCY BROCADES, most artistic designs, elegant color combinations. Black Brocadps, satin or 
ti'i-oss grained 89c 20. inch black Taffeta at 65c $1 24-inch black Taffeta at 80c 

90c 29-inch all silk black Satin at 75c $1.50 24 inch all silk black Satin at S1.12-J 

$1.25 23-inch ivory white Satin at $1. $1.25 23-inch Pean de Soie (latest black silk novelty) at $1 

These quotations are based on actual values. Compare our silks and you will find us cheaper than 
any competition. New goods in all departments. Come to the "popular" store. 



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